Author Topic: A Close-Fitting Sloper  (Read 85938 times)

peterle

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Re: A Close-Fitting Sloper
« Reply #120 on: April 27, 2016, 11:13:54 PM »
Hi peterle, I wondered about this lateral correction earlier.  Is there a danger of constructing a slanted CF.  Might that simply draw attention to the fact.

The slanted CF line is just a construction line. You can choose a different vertical button line for the garment.
But it will be visible in any case. One option is a slightly slanted button line, the other option is the buttonlline is vertical but doesnīt meet the trouserīs center/zip fly when tucked in.

I think a vertical button line will make the asymmetry  less obvious and will be easier to handle with patterned fabrics.

jruley

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Re: A Close-Fitting Sloper
« Reply #121 on: April 27, 2016, 11:29:39 PM »

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I also think that 1/4 " will not be enough. in the pics it seems to need about 3/4 -1".

My wife applied the procedure you suggested:

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How much is the hip out of plumb? Let a weighted string hang vertically down from the nape of the neck. Your buttocks, the line in between to be more precise, will show you how much. No pics needed of this step;-)

She observed the, ahem, "Gesäßrissverschiebung" was very small, more like 1/8".  I though we should start with something a little larger.
If the 1/4" is right, I can test this by adjusting the side seams on the existing toile.  The upper back is shifted so little by this small skew that it doesn't matter if I start at the yoke seam or chest line.  Obviously it will matter if more is needed.

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Is there a danger of constructing a slanted CF. Might that simply draw attention to the fact.

The CF line is already slanted due to the corpulent adjustment that was made to the shirt front. 




peterle

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Re: A Close-Fitting Sloper
« Reply #122 on: April 28, 2016, 01:21:01 AM »

Another method would be to look how much the side seam lines gape when you wear the toile with unsewn side seams. Iīm sure it will be more than 1/2".

jruley

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Re: A Close-Fitting Sloper
« Reply #123 on: April 28, 2016, 03:47:14 AM »
Here is the old toile with the side seams skewed.  After trying the 1/4" from chest line to hip (not shown), I increased the skew to 1/4" from chest line to waist.  The side seams are open below the waist line.

The back appears to me to be nearly symmetrical now, and the amount of gap below the waist is about the same side to side. 

So what do the professionals see?








Schneiderfrei

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Re: A Close-Fitting Sloper
« Reply #124 on: April 28, 2016, 11:04:20 AM »
It is improved but only slightly. It still looks largely like this diagram traced from your previous posting, (below).  The measurements on the tracing are only taken from the tracing and are not your real body measurements but I included them to show the proportion of difference.  The real difference looks to be at least a half inch if not three quarters.

In the back view of your new posting the left side seam still appears very straight and the right side is slanted to the left.

The slant I was referring to in the centre front is referring to a sideways slant, not a forward/backward slant that is produced by the corpulent adjustment.

From the front view, it is clear that the shoulders and the hips do not line up.  The shoulders are displaced to the left.  This is a fixed postural change and is in fact termed a scoliosis. You could see that by tracing the front image and measuring like this:


The entire left trunk profile is completely straight.  The right trunk profile exhibits a strong curve.

It s clear that the arms are resting lightly against the sides.

What is not known to me is what appropriate pattern adjustment would be made here.  You wouldn’t want the CF to slope diagonally?  Do you make changes that are the same as a dropped right shoulder?  I feel I would want to remove some cloth from the right chest in a lateral way.  Maybe this is a problem of lateral balance?
« Last Edit: April 28, 2016, 04:36:50 PM by Schneiderfrei »

Schneiderfrei

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Re: A Close-Fitting Sloper
« Reply #125 on: April 28, 2016, 11:28:47 AM »
Peterle,  Thanks re the construction line note.  Of course, that is so sensible.

jruley

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Re: A Close-Fitting Sloper
« Reply #126 on: April 28, 2016, 12:17:48 PM »

In the back view of your new posting the left side seam still appears very straight and the right side is slanted to the left.


You've lost me - I can't see either side seam in the back view.  There is a fold of cloth on each side which obscures them.

What I meant by "symmetrical" wasn't that the sides are mirror images.  That's not going to happen with the scoliosis.  I meant that the folds and wrinkles appear in about the same places and sizes on both sides.  Maybe "evenly distributed excess" would have been a better term.

Schneiderfrei

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Re: A Close-Fitting Sloper
« Reply #127 on: April 28, 2016, 04:40:26 PM »
Well, at the level of the hips you can see past the folds.  The right is still diagonal while the left is still more vertical.  There is still a cant to the 'horizontal  balance' lines at the waist and chest. Perhaps, I am mistaken but i think you could get a bit better yet in those terms.  I think when the shirt hangs without stress there should be less difference between the right and left sides and the chest and waist marking lines will be dead flat.

peterle

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Re: A Close-Fitting Sloper
« Reply #128 on: April 28, 2016, 07:57:53 PM »
These pic set doesnīt allow a judgement of the alterations.
First pull the toile up a bit in the back. the CB point of the toile is worn a bit too deep in this pic set. This disturbes the balance.

The sideseams have to be closed to show the difference.
But Iīm sure, closed side seams will show a pulling towards the right hip. And the excess isnīt ditributed evenly: see the long fold at the left in the back pic?, it runs straight from the middle of the armhole towards the peak of the butt (is this a appropriate term?Imīnot sure). on the right side it is not. There it runs to the end of the sewn side seam and meets another pulling fold coming up from the peak of the butt.

so my proposal would be:
reopen the sides seams completely,
Put the garment on the table and flatten the back piece.
take the paper pattern and line up the right sideseam/armhole line with the garment.
Take a needle and drive it through the point where armholeline and yokeseam meet.
This is your pivot point.
Now pivot the paper pattern in a way, that the hem/sides seam point moves to the right about 3/4 -1".
Secure paper with weights and copy the armhole/sideseam line to the fabric.
Repeat on the left side, repositioning the seam also to the right.
Do the same to the front parts, making sure everything moves towards your right hip.

Resew.


jruley

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Re: A Close-Fitting Sloper
« Reply #129 on: April 28, 2016, 10:22:07 PM »

so my proposal would be:
reopen the sides seams completely,
Put the garment on the table and flatten the back piece.
take the paper pattern and line up the right sideseam/armhole line with the garment.
Take a needle and drive it through the point where armholeline and yokeseam meet.
This is your pivot point.
Now pivot the paper pattern in a way, that the hem/sides seam point moves to the right about 3/4 -1".
Secure paper with weights and copy the armhole/sideseam line to the fabric.
Repeat on the left side, repositioning the seam also to the right.
Do the same to the front parts, making sure everything moves towards your right hip.

Resew.


Unfortunately there is not enough seam allowance/inlay in the existing toile for these alterations.  The ones in the last photos were the limit.

So, I will make a new toile.  For this I assume I should follow the instructions in post #112, skewting the CB line 3/4" - 1" to the right from the yoke seam to the hem line.

Do I understand correctly?


jruley

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Re: A Close-Fitting Sloper
« Reply #130 on: April 29, 2016, 01:50:17 AM »
Here are the new pattern pieces with the CB line skewed to the right 3/4".  I have kept the CF line the same for convenience in cutting the fronts on the double, but skewed the side seams the same amounts as the backs.





I have allowed 1" at the side seams in case additional alterations need to be made.

peterle

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Re: A Close-Fitting Sloper
« Reply #131 on: April 29, 2016, 01:53:31 AM »
Donīt make a new one. Just sew a strip of fabric to the back right and front left edge where you need it.

You donīt need the center line for the alteration of 128. You just need the side seam/armhole lines to do this. This alteration is just for the toile. If it fits, you can transfer this alteration to the paper pattern.

This alteration will have more or less the same effect as the alteration of 112 would have.

So you can choose between:
1. Changing the paper pattern according 112, transferring the new lines to the toile or a new toile(3/4h work at least).
2. Or making alteration 128 to the toile(10 minutes work) and transferring it to paper when it fits. This is the obviousely the economic version.



peterle

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Re: A Close-Fitting Sloper
« Reply #132 on: April 29, 2016, 02:02:56 AM »
Youīve been faster then me. My last post was the answer to 129.

So you did the paper alteration of 112.
Ok.

But donīt make a new toile, it would be waste of time and fabric.

jruley

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Re: A Close-Fitting Sloper
« Reply #133 on: April 29, 2016, 03:42:32 AM »

So you did the paper alteration of 112.
Ok.

That, plus lunch and a load of laundry!  Retirement living is nice...

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But donīt make a new toile, it would be waste of time and fabric.

Seriously, it's starting to resemble a patchwork quilt.  Making the pattern took longer than cutting and sewing some muslin will.

jruley

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Re: A Close-Fitting Sloper
« Reply #134 on: April 29, 2016, 10:24:14 AM »
Here is the new toile:









Flattening the upper back seems to have increased the shoulder slope, especially on the left side.  The photos show slack in the top and back of the left armhole.  This is much less pronounced on the right side.