like to look sewing a jacket

Started by posaune, April 25, 2017, 02:29:03 AM

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posaune


Schneiderfrei

Thank you posaune.  A simple overview is always useful. And its in English - He he.

G
Schneider sind auch Leute

hutch--

The magnificent tools of the professional tailor
https://movsd.com/tailors_shears/  ;) ;D

Greger

Seems to be an unnecessary amount of fuse. Only watched the clip shown above. For a seasonal jacket why would anyone put in ten thousand stitches. The other website I was bombarded with every jacket has to be made with the same amount of work. Not to much, nor under amount, as though they would know. I say put in enough for that particular garment for its intended purpose. A seasonal jacket will look fine with very little work. A 30 year jacket needs much more work. Good find, Posaune.

lepus

The Queensland University of Technology, that published this series has many more, over 150 I counted today, videos produced, including basic operation of a (Japanese type) knitting machine. They are obviously meant to offer fashion and design students some help in constructing sample garments and provide an overlap between designer and sample maker. I can't see much tailoring quality, there won't be many tailoring establishments that mark the parts with a cloth drill, for example. The construction of what they called a welt pocket, but is actually a jetted pocket, in parts 5 and 6 disappointed me: thin-lipped variety, cutting through the jettings. Why is there so much confusion about terminology? Is it an American influence? Many languages have clearly different terms for the different pocket types, in German for instance Leistentasche (welt pocket) vs. Paspeltasche (jetted pocket). Increasingly one sees on blogs etc. that they are all called welt pockets. Stop the rot!

Here are all the videos listed:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfC1gMvFLt-gQjsuuRv0u0A/videos?&ytbChannel=QUTFashionStudio
For a similar, but different approach, the West Valley College videos of the Fashion Department may also be interesting.

Tailleuse

Quote from: lepus on April 28, 2017, 09:48:23 AM
The construction of what they called a welt pocket, but is actually a jetted pocket


lepus:

I often encounter confusing or seemingly conflicting information. At first I thought that that welt and jetted pockets must be different, but then I began to believe they were the same thing. Can you describe the difference, or link to some descriptions or photos?

posaune

Lepsus
that is the cause why I have chosen for this the RTW or MTM  Discussion. For me it is like looking porn (if I may say this).
And yes, the terminology is very confused.  In Germany many of the home sewer know more american/english terminus technicus than the german. If I mention the german word "St├╝tznaht" I get some empty stare  if I say the  stay stitching  everybody knows what I'm talking about.
lg
posaune

Hendrick


I noticed this discussion a tad late. But I guess Lepus is onto something;the blurring of jargon is striking... But in my experience, it has everything to do with outsourcing and the preparation of "tech-packs"that are sent out to far away suppliers. I, for one, noticed that every form of binding, welting etc. is called "tape"in these "documents"... No matter if it comes on rols, is cut out of outer fabric ("shell fabric", lately), is woven or knitted, fusible, cut to the bias or not and regardless the thickness; it is called "tape". Same for "topstitch"; any visible stitching is referred to as "topstitch", regardless the function, if any... Best I've yet seen; referring to the the inside of a garment as "bad side of the fabric". So, um, be prepared to roll over...

posaune

hehe I can understand this term.  I'm moving and the "bad side of fabric" is that I have horded too much.
lg
posaune

spookietoo

Thanks for posting this posaune - it finally forced me to explore the terms "jetted" vs "welt" vs "besom".

It seems "jetted" is official British tailoring usage and usually I would attempt to adapt such usage. But.....American home sewing has referred to "jetted" as "welt" pockets for years....actually decades. Then there is also the difference between mens' and womens' jacket/coat design. It is not at all unusual -or wierd- to see hip pockets on a womans' jacket constructed virtually identical to a traditional mans' breast pocket. This would probably be how "single welt" and "double welt" jargon was created. The only time I can recall seeing this hip usage on a mans' jacket is on very casual, non-tailored - menswear.

So, right or wrong, I'll just stick to the term , "welt pocket" myself, though I will try to be more specific on this forum if need be.

The red stuff we eat on french fries (UK "chips") here in the states is called, "ketchup". Pronounced similar to, "catch-up".  The word was originally spelled, "catsup", though everyone said ketchup. Except for my third grade teacher, Mrs. Cunningham. She forbade us from mispronouncing the word. We had to say, "cat-sup". I spent what must have been a very annoying year correcting every adult that "mispronounced" the word. I finally gave up.

I can't remember the last time I purchased a bottle of the red stuff that didn't have the word "ketchup" on the front label. "Catsup" is extinct. Language changes.

My pet peeve: "button down shirt". Up until 15-20 years ago, that descriptive always denoted a very specific style of shirt for both men and women - a shirt with a collar that buttoned down. Now, due to internet shopping, and generations of people that never bothered to learn terminology (even though their dads were still wearing "button downs", the term has been mis-appropriated and now causes confusion. Heaven help anyone trying to buy an actual button down. I was recently in a retail store that actually signed the mens' dress shirts as "button front" shirts. Made me want to kiss somebody....and meant I'm not the only human ticked with this.

Oh well... sorry for the diversion...off to view the video......

Greger

Button Up and Button Down.
Button Down are the collar buttons.
Button Up are the buttons for closing the front.

Henry Hall

Quote from: GregerButton Up are the buttons for closing the front.

Even though most people button downwards from top to bottom!

I don't know why Americans call a shirt a 'button down' shirt. We all know a shirt has buttons so what other kind of 'shirt' could it be referring to?
'Being perfectly well-dressed gives one a tranquillity that no religion can bestow.' - Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Schneiderfrei

He he ..  Merry Christmas Henry Hall, and everyone else.

G
Schneider sind auch Leute

Greger

Some Western Shirts (Cowboy) have Snaps. They have some advantages to buttons. Both methods are nice.

Merry Christmas To All!

Schneiderfrei

And to you Greger.  I hope the nesxt year is a good one.

G
Schneider sind auch Leute