Author Topic: Is sleeve cap ease necessary without a raised head?  (Read 565 times)

posaune

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Re: Is sleeve cap ease necessary without a raised head?
« Reply #15 on: April 22, 2020, 06:22:04 AM »
Hi Schneiderfrei,
I think the last statement is not true. People who knew next to nothing about tailoring worked on the book. You must imagine the process in this times printing a book was not so easy like today and much more expensive too.  And if you were not a good "Lektor" yourself - and a good tailor must not necessary be a good one - you got mistakes programmed.The production of the pics (clichee) where expensive too. And mostly the drawings were done not by a tailor too.
posaune

Hendrick

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Re: Is sleeve cap ease necessary without a raised head?
« Reply #16 on: April 22, 2020, 06:43:01 AM »


I am not totally sure…  Of course the auther would do a thorough reading and copy check before a work was "ready for print". However, I remember some study books that had purposely wrong formulations in them. After some time they even became a well kept secret amongst students to an almost anecdotic level... When the first HP scientific calculators came out, we were not allowed to use them at all time. There were some "typically inherent" glitches in these things, but only in the tiniest of fractions; enough though to inform the profs of their use...

Schneiderfrei

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Re: Is sleeve cap ease necessary without a raised head?
« Reply #17 on: April 22, 2020, 09:16:29 AM »
I can see you are right posaune, yet I do think that the errors are very common.  At least Hofenbitzer includes corrective stickers with his books. It was quite amusing to paste the stickers in when I received my copy.

Like Henrick, I am suspicious in other fields as well. I have never seen a table of boat offsets that was completely correct (The shape of the boats hull is recorded as a set of numbers to be applied to a drawn up frame, just like a garment draft).  The result being that one is compelled to Loft (draft) the thing every time in full size on the floor of some very large space. I wonder what Steelmillal's experience is in this matter.

G

posaune

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Re: Is sleeve cap ease necessary without a raised head?
« Reply #18 on: April 23, 2020, 01:31:23 AM »
 :) When I was very young when I had to prepare manuscripts for printing. And there was not a single mistake or wrong formula or drawing that was made willfully. These things just happen. :(
lg
posaune

Schneiderfrei

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Re: Is sleeve cap ease necessary without a raised head?
« Reply #19 on: April 23, 2020, 02:12:13 PM »
I see I have been too cynical. I shall remove this attitude from my mind.

Goodness we are having a wonderful thunderstorm today.

LG

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posaune

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Re: Is sleeve cap ease necessary without a raised head?
« Reply #20 on: April 24, 2020, 02:54:22 AM »
oh oh don't you fret, Schneiderfrei! You touched just my soft spot. It was a tedious work going over and over the manuscripts. Then my boss arrived and with one glance he pointed to this and that. Frustrating.
lg
posaune

Schneiderfrei

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Re: Is sleeve cap ease necessary without a raised head?
« Reply #21 on: April 24, 2020, 12:36:08 PM »
I do know how easy it is to spot others mistakes.  ;)

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Greger

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Re: Is sleeve cap ease necessary without a raised head?
« Reply #22 on: May 10, 2020, 01:19:14 PM »
I wonder what kind of seam goes into the shoulder. A lapped seam?
One advantage of over the shoulder seam is for mussel movement and shoulder-blade movement.

Hendrick

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Re: Is sleeve cap ease necessary without a raised head?
« Reply #23 on: May 13, 2020, 06:28:18 AM »

Greger, I have wondered about the construction too. Someone mentioned the odd position of the shoulder seam. I looked at some old napoleontic coats and noticed that the shoulder of the foreparts was cut to the horizontal grain of the fabric and the shoulderline of the back was near bias...
Evidently, I did not have the opportunity to see the construction inside...

Greger

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Re: Is sleeve cap ease necessary without a raised head?
« Reply #24 on: May 14, 2020, 05:09:22 PM »
Hendrick, The bias certainly helps. The horizontal grain has a little stretch, not much. But, do you add half an inch or more length? Eased in? If you are adding canvas, then it goes over the shoulder further for a cleaner shoulder. Need less shoulder pad that way, too. Another advantage is one more seam out of sight. The seam starts back around the back of the neck further (which may aid in even more freedom of movement, but maybe not, that can be adjusted elsewhere, perhaps). Some old books explain this seam I believe. Silk coats in the past have steeper seam in back for shoulder? Silk has less stretch?
Shaped cloth, another subject, has less stress when in movement than flat pressing. Set the weave from flat to curved, according to the shape of the body. Well done and it becomes magical.
Pass my bed time. Zzzzzzz

Hendrick

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Re: Is sleeve cap ease necessary without a raised head?
« Reply #25 on: May 16, 2020, 06:54:44 AM »

I actually never found any valuable documentation on it. But agreed; magic when mastered… Nite!

Henry Hall

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Re: Is sleeve cap ease necessary without a raised head?
« Reply #26 on: May 16, 2020, 10:00:08 AM »
I assume this is the cotton garments book by 'Harry Simons'? There are lots of odd errors (or omissions) in several of his little books. Some time back I made some trousers from his drafts and had to significantly alter parts of the draft. I've also tried one of the cotton jackets, maybe the 'barber's jacket', and had to adapt the sleeve myself because it was just annoying.

If I was going to make another cotton jacket - like 'workwear' (and I think I would) - then I would just use a general draft and  redraw the sleeve. I have a vintage denim engineer's jacket and I've examined how the (2-piece) sleeve is cut and attached, but I'm reluctant to disassemble it for the purposes of reverse engineering.
‘Being perfectly well-dressed gives one a tranquillity that no religion can bestow.’ - Ralph Waldo Emerson.