Recent Posts

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They are a nice piece of German engineering, cutting edges are high speed steel and they rarely ever need sharpening. She bought them over 30 years ago and paid a fortune for them but used them all of her working life and the main reason why they were resharpened was due to accidents like cutting through pins.

All I did was give them a quick scrub and rematch the ends, they did not need sharpening. They are now very rare, a full internet search only found 2 old images.
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That's a well made pair of shears. I have never heard of Peltex before Hutch.
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Hi Meagan,

Welcome on board, I imagine your day occupation would be useful to you conceptually as drafting patterns has a similar logic to it. A workshop full of your own toys is good for you.

My day job's skills definitely apply, both in the management of shapes as part of larger dynamic systems, and in thinking about creating a garment not as an object, but as an experience for the wearer. My specialty in my day job is research psychology applied to website design. This actually transfers really well. It's given me a really high frustration tolerance and appreciation for making order from chaos. I feel that taking all the vast variables -fabric choice, seam type, pattern issues, body shapes, etc- and making order from that chaos uses similar parts of my brain.

It's different in the best ways, too. I love the craftsmanship of tailoring. I love the precision of creating beauty with my own hands. My professional industry does not care at all about doing things *well* or building things that last, much less making things beautiful. I do. This conflict made my career a real disappointment. I love the actual work, to be clear. I love working as a craftsman to make the Internet more useful and usable. Unfortunately, I don't actually get to do that very much. The way I've taken it on, my sewing is all about making things that last, being present and putting the most CARE into every step. I'm a grade A neurotic and I just love doing things a dozen times and getting it perfect.

I recently had a layoff and have been using the free time to improve my sewing craftsmanship. I started taking it REALLY seriously, treating improving like a job.  I found I can do this 8 hours a day day in and day out, and I love it all the more. I expected pattern drafting to be really difficult for me, as I'd considered myself bad at math. I've found I have quite the knack for it, though I'm just barely getting started. It may be a beginner's overconfidence. I deeply enjoy the struggle, though. It has definitely been very good for me, as you said.
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The younger brother of an old friend that passed away some time ago brought up from the country one of her pairs of German made Peltex dressmakers shears and after a little TLC they have shaped up in very good condition. I maintained both pairs for her for over 30 years but they will never be used again, just kept as a memento for an old friend.


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Introduction from New Members / Re: Please introduce yourself here.
« Last post by Hendrick on October 25, 2020, 11:26:15 PM »

Welcome all of you...

Schneiderfrei; I think that is a great idea...
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Professional Tailors / Re: Preferred Seam Allowances, Question for Book
« Last post by Schneiderfrei on October 25, 2020, 09:35:50 PM »
I am not a professional, but I have not heard of 1 cm seams being used in industry, rather for homesewers.  All the German ones I've encountered are 0.75 cm.  And I thought 1/4 inch for British seams.  I would be very happy to be corrected in this though.

G
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Professional Tailors / Re: Preferred Seam Allowances, Question for Book
« Last post by JM MacLachlan on October 25, 2020, 03:04:58 PM »
Well Im already doing it dual measure systems. I'm just not sure how common 1cm seams are or if even "standard".
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Welcome Meagan, finehand,

Many of us will have a similar reason for being here.

G
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Hi Meagan,

Welcome on board, I imagine your day occupation would be useful to you conceptually as drafting patterns has a similar logic to it. A workshop full of your own toys is good for you.
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Hello,
I'm delighted to find myself here and hope to participate and contribute to this community. By day I'm a digital product designer and illustrator. I started sewing mercenarily. I wanted clothes I couldn't afford, and I love masculine traditional tailoring. That poses a problem for a petite woman. It's been about a year of deliberate practice. I make most of my own clothes. I didn't expect to fall in love with this, but I have. I am happiest in my workshop. I'm starting to learn to draft from scratch, and my ambitions have grown. I'm taking on my first traditionally tailored blazer soon. My name is Meagan, and I'm in Princeton,NJ, USA now and will likely be in Stockholm, Sweden next year. 
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