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Drafting, Fitting and Construction / Re: shirt drafting, forward collar
« Last post by Greger on May 31, 2020, 12:13:32 PM »
There is a measure that I think would be handy. It's called the strap measure. It is from the nape down to the chest level at the vertical line of  the scye. This measure shows if the that distance is correct, short or long. It is a check measure. It can be used for pattern making, too. In American patterns it is used with the blade measurement. From center back level across to the bottom strap measure point. I think these two measurements would help find problems. A couple of worthy "tools".
To get rid of some of the excess width in back the shoulder slope, armhole shape can be adjusted.
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Drafting, Fitting and Construction / Re: iron work on a two piece sleeve
« Last post by Greger on May 31, 2020, 10:35:52 AM »
Believe Poulin's book has another method.
Classic Tailoring Techniques: A Construction Guide For Men's Wear - Meyers, Patricia Flaherty, even another method.
Sleeve design can make a difference.
A properly hung sleeve, shaped right (cut), scye the same, and the problem could be from somewhere else on the garment. The part that is sewn into the scye might need to be longer at certain places.
There's more. Clothing is about art. Which is appeal, desirable, cool, other people look at it and say, "I want it", and the list goes on. Tailoring is about a higher standard than something bought at the store. If you need extra length in the sleeve at cap. How are you going to do that?  Can you shrink it in? What about pleasing looking ripples? You set the tone and the attitude. Not copy. Or trying to fit in. Your doing more. You are setting a standard that everyone else wants. And the rich pay. Even some poor will save up to buy some of these garments. Tailors that are overwhelmed with much work charge high prices. The rest don't. Tailoring really isn't about snobbery. It's about art.
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The Apprentice's Forum / Re: Detachable collars: construction
« Last post by SlipInTime on May 31, 2020, 12:33:18 AM »
How many tailors never used a machine to sew? Hand sewing allows for better manipulation than machines. There are machine methods and some people are really good at them. Easing a longer layer on a shorter layer by hand is stitch by stitch control. Basting and shrinking and then machine sewing is another. You can get some shape doing it these ways. But if you hand it to a laundromat what are they going to do with it? Press it flat?

So here's the problem with machine methods:

DPC shows how to do a stretched seam for cuffs, basically you grab & tug one layer of the cuff as you sew, stretching it which results in an inner and outer cylinder which don't ripple. I don't rate his method, I find you need to change the order of steps to get a neat finish, but I do credit him with learning the technique.

But collars are like...cut on the vertical and horizontal of the fabric. Whereas collars usually have some lines and curves which cross the bias. So if you try and use machine stretched seams as he advises, you actually stretch the whole point in all sorts of ways which won't lie flat again - not just stretch on the seam, but the whole collar comes out of shape. At least, that's what happens when I do it.

I tried pad-stitch-basting the collar layers together and then machine stitching, but this didn't work - in other words, the stretch/curve/whatever needs to be placed *exactly* on the line of sewing. So my next variant is going to try that. 

In one sense, it's good to be learning through experimentation, but it's frustrating too sometimes *sigh*
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The Apprentice's Forum / Re: Detachable collars: construction
« Last post by SlipInTime on May 31, 2020, 12:25:26 AM »
How many tailors never used a machine to sew? Hand sewing allows for better manipulation than machines. There are machine methods and some people are really good at them. Easing a longer layer on a shorter layer by hand is stitch by stitch control. Basting and shrinking and then machine sewing is another. You can get some shape doing it these ways. But if you hand it to a laundromat what are they going to do with it? Press it flat?

According to David Page Coffin's Shirtmaking, if you make a collar which has curve in it, then you need to send the shirt to a specialist laundry who will know how to handle it correctly. Not sure how, exactly, you find a specialist laundry, but they exist to solve this problem, it seems!


(Thanks everyone for some great discussion btw, I'm digging into your links now.

Sharing what I've discovered:

A V&A historic collar with some information about construction during the period.

Some terrifying collar history including ways your collar could kill you. Nothing says fashion like your entire neck bursting into flames *thumbs up*
)

Edit: to get my URL code correctly formatted
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The Apprentice's Forum / Re: Detachable collars: construction
« Last post by SlipInTime on May 31, 2020, 12:14:06 AM »
Fusibles are obviously not period correct, but if you're not worried about that, then DHJ 160 Fusetop is a good option - for maximum stiffness, you can use two layers.

See, I've been wondering about that. The (online) research I've done has revealed some collars were made out of paper, rubber, or a paper backed onto linen called linene. Obviously, getting "real" linene won't be possible nowadays, but I feel like linen + fusible interfacing is, to my intuition at least, a fairly close replica of what linene would be like. Some kind of fabric+ some kind of papery substance, bonded together.

 
 

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Drafting, Fitting and Construction / Re: What is causing this shirt sleeve fold?
« Last post by posaune on May 30, 2020, 08:33:24 PM »
It is not easy to see. I think the sleeve's hem touches your back knuckles (Knöchel? Word) so the sleeve pit can be wrong. But the cap height too.
Remove the sleeve. draw a vertical line from shoulder point down to hem, draw a horizontal line  at the side seam Armhole point. Baste it in with the lower part but pin the upper. Make a pic. Decide if you must rotate the sleeve cap (the arm should sit in the center of the sleeve)  and if you must add height to the crown (the horizontal line should be horizontal and not pulled up at center). And as it looks if you have eased the sleeve in - maybe the cap is too wide as well as Schneiderfrei suggested.
lg
posaune
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The Apprentice's Forum / Re: Unlined - Unstructured Jacket (project #4)
« Last post by tom bennett on May 30, 2020, 06:30:34 PM »
You can use a light tropic weight body canvas which is hidden by the facings. If you use pocketing it is generally made from Silesia. I would suggest if you are not cutting the darts open to pick stitch the dart seam to keep it folded back and is something you'll see on Neapolitan coats.
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The Marketplace / Re: Chalk sharpener
« Last post by tom bennett on May 30, 2020, 06:22:38 PM »
I'm going to buy one, plus a chalk holder, they look great and the price is very reasonable, had a an email exchange with them yesterday. I normally use a cheese grater or a knife, I used to have a proper sharpener but can't find it. Thanks for sharing.
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The Apprentice's Forum / Re: Unlined - Unstructured Jacket (project #4)
« Last post by supercilious on May 30, 2020, 05:01:45 PM »
You don't have to cut the darts open. Just press without cutting!
It can leave an impression on the garment face if not careful though
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The Marketplace / Re: Chalk sharpener
« Last post by hutch-- on May 30, 2020, 12:33:14 PM »
Hi Andrea,

Nice gadget, I always did it the hard way scraping the edge of the chalk.
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