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I agree - years ago google translate was rather worthless, for the most part. But the translators today are amazing to me.  Idioms of course can still be an issue, but then thankfully German isn't as laced with idioms as say Spanish - those change from country to country. 
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This is worth mentioning.
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Women's Cutter And Tailor / Re: Using a men's draft for women's slacks
« Last post by Tailleuse on September 20, 2017, 06:59:06 AM »
I've never understood what 'sloper' is supposed to mean, though it seems to me it is just another name for a block pattern.

They are sometimes used interchangeably, but technically a sloper is a basic draft without seam allowances, which makes it easier to develop into a pattern.
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The Apprentice's Forum / Re: Use of old dry irons w/o thermostat
« Last post by Schneiderfrei on September 12, 2017, 09:04:31 AM »
Thank you Jefferey,

The comments I remembered were in the "Vintage Irons" post, the last one, especially J Maclochlainn #9:

"Yes, Mr. Kelner

What you want to do (and this takes... what's the word?... experience) is to let it heat up. periodically as it heats up you want to make the iron speak. You know it's the right temp as soon as striking the iron with moist fingers you get a good pitched "SPPPPPSSSSSS". Unplug and use the iron in quick movements to get your desired effect. You can't massage the cloth like you did in your video. Each movement must be solid and deliberate. "
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The Apprentice's Forum / Re: Use of old dry irons w/o thermostat
« Last post by Schneiderfrei on September 12, 2017, 08:54:48 AM »
I am right with you about the photobucket Gramountoto!  They still mostly yield up their images if you click on them tho.
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The Apprentice's Forum / Re: Use of old dry irons w/o thermostat
« Last post by Gramountoto on September 12, 2017, 06:15:46 AM »

Thank you all !

The threads on the CT forum are actually very helpful, thanks Jeffrey.
I should have checked there first but I must confess that these blind photobucket pictures everywhere make me sad and frustrated so I avoid visits there as much as possible.

T.
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The Apprentice's Forum / Re: Use of old dry irons w/o thermostat
« Last post by Greger on September 12, 2017, 04:21:34 AM »
Some cloths need a "cool" iron. Heat, as well as cloth, is chemistry. Synthetics responds very different than natural cloth under different temps. The amount of pressure from the weight of the iron matters, too. Thin cloth doesn't need much weight, and skippy Synthetics, practically nothing. A 20 pound iron and shirt cotton you might be holding up 10 to 15 pounds off the cloth. To flatten some seams you need more weight, so you let some more weight settle down. The old tailors had a lot of muscles. When you look at home sewers irons you see a dial to adjust the temperature for different cloths and the entire weight of these irons are skimpy. The old tailors learned how much weight and heat and how to use press cloths and when to use water and how much water to use. Many tailors today use 6 pound irons because the cloths are so light. If they were making dresses the iron might be even lighter. Some tailors are artist with the iron.
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The Apprentice's Forum / Re: Use of old dry irons w/o thermostat
« Last post by hutch-- on September 12, 2017, 12:47:32 AM »
Something I learnt while handling this very light lycra, something that you should not overheat or use an iron on, BE FAST or fry it. I had this problem with the lycra curling and the trick was to iron it flat on my cutting table but you had to be fast so you did not wreck it. I am old enough to have seen the ancient solid iron types as they tended to get used as door stops and the fabrics of the era they came from would generally have been a lot more robust than modern synthetics but the old rule applies, be fast enough NOT to burn the fabric.
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The Apprentice's Forum / Re: Use of old dry irons w/o thermostat
« Last post by Schneiderfrei on September 11, 2017, 08:35:18 AM »
I think you do unplug them Gramountoto.

Somewhere on the C and T I read that once they are hot enough to give a hiss if you  flick water onto the flat surface, you turn them off.

I would love to know if this is correct though.

G
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