Recent posts

#1
Putting this up for anyone in the area. May be an amazing auction. Cheers.

https://charlotte.craigslist.org/bfd/d/lincolnton-late-model-cut-sew-facility/7753504147.html
#2
General Discussion / The Suit, Savile Row and Smart...
Last post by Gerry - June 11, 2024, 02:38:23 AM
#3
Quote from: Chanterelle on June 10, 2024, 06:18:26 AMHe's very judgmental...we call him inspector Charles...always needs to know what's going on and to give his approval. Not sure I got it here lol!

My Aunt had a Shar Pei. It was like an international border crossing agent. If you didn't have the correct odour, no entry!

At the end of my cousins marriage, before it ended, it bit her husband in the crotch without warning - Nasty.
#4
I was told to sew the sleeve on first, and then, close the sideseam and sleeve length seam in one go. This was all hand sewing. No machine.
Since you are using a sewing machine or overcaster/serger the needle or foot does not go high enough. These can, most likely, be adjusted, so you can go over the high places where seams get thick. Same technique as hand sewing. Sometimes hand sewing is faster.
Back a couple of hundred years ago, since the sleeve seam is longer than the scye, you decide where you want the ease and from that point on you push with your thumb an 1/8 inch extra per stitch until end of ease stitches. Beginners learn to take two threads and sew them, about half an inch apart, through the part of ease and pull the threads the to amount to hold them properly together. Then baste it to the scye to sew that seam later. There is a name for this, but I don't remember.
After the seam is finished the hem is finished and the bottoms of the are sleeves (plackets and cuffs) are finished.
#5
You may have the right dimension across the front of your pattern. But it's not in the right place. If you move the top line, perhaps 1/2 inch forwards and redraw the the lines down to the rest of the draft. Because your belly is forward a bit you can't draw the line straight up in front. If you add inlays, when cutting the cloth, the inlays leaves room for adjustments available when you have it on. The inlays are for fitting purposes, and that excess, is cut off later when you are sure the fit is correct, and then, the pattern is adjusted. The lines will be curved. You may need extra height in the front, too. Talking about both the front and side seam lines down about 8 inches, more or less.
#6
Drafting, Fitting and Construction / Re: Shirt *Construction* techn...
Last post by Gerry - June 10, 2024, 07:12:38 AM
Quote from: Chanterelle on June 10, 2024, 06:20:59 AMI'll definitely give this a try but will have to alter the pattern a touch to shift the arm seam forward yeah?

Yes, as described in one of my previous posts, shave a bit off the front seam and add it to the back's. When the sleeve is sewn in, its seam is offset, being a little more forward than the side seam. The two should be clear of each other so how much of an offset you need depends on the width of your seams. I use a 3/8ths offset for quarter inch seams. 
#7
Drafting, Fitting and Construction / Re: Trouser fitting/drafting h...
Last post by Gerry - June 10, 2024, 07:05:32 AM
Quote from: Chanterelle on June 10, 2024, 06:18:26 AMAdding ease in the sides amounts to just adding to the pattern outseam on the front panel? the problem is that the waist fits good as is...trying to avoid having a dart in the front for aesthetic reasons, and avoid an overly curved sideseam. Suggestions?

Leave a belt or adjusters to hold up your trousers, don't rely on a waistband to do it. You can make your waistband a snug fit, but don't overtighten things to the point where it digs in (as is the case here).

You need to release the side seams, back and front, in equal measure. Otherwise you'll be dragging the seams towards the back over the hip area, giving them a crooked appearance. If letting things out disrupts the fit at the back ...well, that's what darts are for.
#8
The Marketplace / Re: Hutch's Shear collection -...
Last post by Chanterelle - June 10, 2024, 06:40:24 AM
Would love a pair in the 12" or sub 12" range. Don't think I could afford/justify to my wife spending anything more than $75, though I have no idea if you'd consider that a lowball.

What would you consider a reasonable offer here?
#9
Quote from: Gerry on June 10, 2024, 04:26:17 AMI'd urge you to give set-in sleeves a try, because they're so much easier to sew. You're not fighting  differences in shape as happens when sewing sleeves into the armhole flat. As I mentioned earlier, if cut correctly the armhole and sleeve seams align nicely, almost like a straight line, which makes sewing a lot easier. Just keep rotating the sleeve as you sew, to stop it getting twisted up and restricting movement and view.

I'll definitely give this a try but will have to alter the pattern a touch to shift the arm seam forward yeah?

Have tried Maldonado's approach to no avail...more mess than it's worth imo and the seam isn't as pleasant to look at
#10
Quote from: Gerry on June 10, 2024, 05:34:53 AMI love your dog's expression in photo no. 2. Very Oliver Hardy: "You see what I have to put up with?!".  :)

He's very judgmental...we call him inspector Charles...always needs to know what's going on and to give his approval. Not sure I got it here lol!

Adding ease in the sides amounts to just adding to the pattern outseam on the front panel? the problem is that the waist fits good as is...trying to avoid having a dart in the front for aesthetic reasons, and avoid an overly curved sideseam. Suggestions?