Shirt *Construction* techniques

Started by Chanterelle, April 07, 2024, 02:03:56 AM

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Chanterelle

Quote from: Gerry on April 09, 2024, 10:40:29 PMhttps://flic.kr/p/2pJ7x7z

That you are able to match so well through the flat fell seam is pretty incredible (assuming its not a french seam)

Chanterelle

Quote from: Gerry on April 15, 2024, 10:03:36 PMSecond up, closing the side seams using a hemmer foot. The only video I've seen that explains this, though I posted the details in a past thread, here:

https://movsd.com/BespokeCutter/index.php?topic=1226.0

I had a real 'duh' moment watching his vid. Having passed everything through the hemmer, he then flattens the seam and passes it under the hemmer foot again, though without coupling it so that the seam only runs in the channel of the foot. This keeps it nicely aligned as it passes through to the needle for edge stitching/felling flat. When I was trying this technique, I changed feet to do the felling, simply edge stitching the hemmed seam. His way is far simpler and superior, as it's more accurate. Very clever; and so obvious now that I've seen it.

https://www.youtube.com/live/eliUz5bLtNs?si=gmwYiWvJbhPBafVZ&t=1612


The problem I've had with this technique is that since I attach the sleeves first, I cannot ever get the sleeve/body seam through the hemmer foot, no matter which kind of hemmer foot I use (I've tried them all I think)


Gerry

Quote from: Chanterelle on June 10, 2024, 02:58:54 AMThe problem I've had with this technique is that since I attach the sleeves first, I cannot ever get the sleeve/body seam through the hemmer foot, no matter which kind of hemmer foot I use (I've tried them all I think)

Whenever I've seen hemmed seams, the sleeves have always been completed separately then set in. There's too much bulk for a hemmer foot to cope with if trying to close the sleeve and body seams in one, continuous run.

I mentioned the Mike Maldonado trick earlier, whereby you decouple the hemmer coming up to areas too thick to pass through the foot, and recouple the cloth just after the bulk. You 'simply' come back to the unstitched area(s) after sewing the majority of the seam/hem, tuck in the loose cloth to complete the hem and edge stitch it in place with a normal foot. In reality, it's pretty fiddly due to the narrowness of seams/hems and results aren't great (though you might find it easier that I did).

I'd urge you to give set-in sleeves a try, because they're so much easier to sew. You're not fighting  differences in shape as happens when sewing sleeves into the armhole flat. As I mentioned earlier, if cut correctly the armhole and sleeve seams align nicely, almost like a straight line, which makes sewing a lot easier. Just keep rotating the sleeve as you sew, to stop it getting twisted up and restricting movement and view.

Gerry

Quote from: Gerry on April 20, 2024, 06:25:47 PMThe vid to follow contains a few things that caught my eye. Firstly, he demonstrates a couple of folding techniques. One for chamfered cuffs, which I hadn't seen before (everyone seems to trim their seams), the other for collar-point turning.

https://youtu.be/HaEO7VlbAk4?si=zc3GU1xhDFh4dZKc&t=492

I had come across two-stage collar-point folding via DPC's Craftsy video series; and a three-stage method is also demonstrated in one of his books, However, it's along the lines of a conventional mitred corner and is fiddly with narrow seams. In the above vid the tailor demonstrates a more manageable method IMO. The side seam is folded first, then he forms a diagonal at its top before folding down the top seam. I should think that grading the seams at the points would help reduce bulk.

I gave this method a try. Very fiddly to do with a quarter inch seam. However, what I tend to do with my undercollars is increase their seam width to half an inch at the points only. This naturally grades the seams at the points and also gives one a little cloth to grab onto when folding. I have to say, the above method worked beautifully (with extra seam allowance at the undercollar's points). My old way of folding was a bit hit-or-miss, but I achieved perfect points with the above method, as can be seen in my latest Italian Collar shirt:

https://flic.kr/p/2pWnJPG

I changed the order slightly, but it's still the same thing. Copied and pasted from my notes:

Fold over the top/horizontal seams of the collar first and finger press, running a fingernail over the fold to give a definite crease. Now diagonally fold the corner, just outside the vertical, side seam's stitch line. Fold and pull in the side seam so that its stitching is just rolled over to the inside of the collar and visible on top. This not only keeps the fold at the tip of the collar tight, but also allows the seam to relax/expand back into shape after bagging out, rather than trying to cram it into a tight area.

Bring a haemostat right into the corner of this fold, its length in line with the stitch line of the collar's side seam, and clamp. Rotate the haemostat in to the collar to keep tension along the fold. Holding the haemostat with the other hand, release it and place a finger into the collar, bringing it directly beneath the jaws. Applying slight pressure with the thumb to maintain the pinch, roll and pull the stitching of the seam slightly inwards. Bag out, wiggling the haemostat if necessary to bring out the point (but don't overdo it).

Chanterelle

Quote from: Gerry on June 10, 2024, 04:26:17 AMI'd urge you to give set-in sleeves a try, because they're so much easier to sew. You're not fighting  differences in shape as happens when sewing sleeves into the armhole flat. As I mentioned earlier, if cut correctly the armhole and sleeve seams align nicely, almost like a straight line, which makes sewing a lot easier. Just keep rotating the sleeve as you sew, to stop it getting twisted up and restricting movement and view.

I'll definitely give this a try but will have to alter the pattern a touch to shift the arm seam forward yeah?

Have tried Maldonado's approach to no avail...more mess than it's worth imo and the seam isn't as pleasant to look at

Gerry

Quote from: Chanterelle on June 10, 2024, 06:20:59 AMI'll definitely give this a try but will have to alter the pattern a touch to shift the arm seam forward yeah?

Yes, as described in one of my previous posts, shave a bit off the front seam and add it to the back's. When the sleeve is sewn in, its seam is offset, being a little more forward than the side seam. The two should be clear of each other so how much of an offset you need depends on the width of your seams. I use a 3/8ths offset for quarter inch seams. 

Greger

I was told to sew the sleeve on first, and then, close the sideseam and sleeve length seam in one go. This was all hand sewing. No machine.
Since you are using a sewing machine or overcaster/serger the needle or foot does not go high enough. These can, most likely, be adjusted, so you can go over the high places where seams get thick. Same technique as hand sewing. Sometimes hand sewing is faster.
Back a couple of hundred years ago, since the sleeve seam is longer than the scye, you decide where you want the ease and from that point on you push with your thumb an 1/8 inch extra per stitch until end of ease stitches. Beginners learn to take two threads and sew them, about half an inch apart, through the part of ease and pull the threads the to amount to hold them properly together. Then baste it to the scye to sew that seam later. There is a name for this, but I don't remember.
After the seam is finished the hem is finished and the bottoms of the are sleeves (plackets and cuffs) are finished.

Gerry

The long way round of doing things:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z5-rLWYM7Xc&t=1421s

If only some of the bespoke firms took this amount of care and attention in their work. Whenever you see footage of their workshops there's barely an iron in sight ... and it's reflected in their results, frankly.

Schneiderfrei

I just thought of Mike Maldonado, he used to run a course on shirt construction.

I signe up for a bit. The course reflected his intensive, professional production model,but it was really good to see.
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