Author Topic: 1939 Dutch shirt pattern  (Read 133 times)

pfaff260

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1939 Dutch shirt pattern
« on: October 04, 2020, 10:49:35 PM »
For those amongst us who can read dutch, here's a pattern for a dress shirt with a collarstand and a loose collar from " De moderne kleermaker from 1939!








TTailor

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Re: 1939 Dutch shirt pattern
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2020, 12:14:16 AM »
Nice, thanks.
I do wish I could read Dutch but I bet I can muddle through the draft!

Schneiderfrei

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Re: 1939 Dutch shirt pattern
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2020, 01:35:52 AM »
How wonderful,

Another shirt draft.  They are so scarce.

G

posaune

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Re: 1939 Dutch shirt pattern
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2020, 08:15:07 PM »
Hi Pfaff260
what is a halsboordje? Nr. 6 in pagina 3 and in pagina 4 described how to do it the last columm near the end.
Is this a stand where you can button on the collar? (I read somewhere the collar were washed and starched seperately in the past)
Maybe the shirts (so long!) where used as nightgowns too. In the next morning button on a fresh collar and off you go :D
lg
posaune
(but I see it is translated from Rundschau? - so german draft?? The pics have the german terms)

theresa in tucson

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Re: 1939 Dutch shirt pattern
« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2020, 12:08:47 AM »
Collars came to be detachable and separate from the shirt probably after someone got the idea when needing to replace a worn or stained collar.  The shirt was constructed with a band and the collar was constructed to be attached to that band.  Collars get dirty (think about access to bathing facilities) and wear out faster than the shirt.  Posaune, you are correct in saying "button on a fresh collar and off you go" since the shirt was hidden under the coat or jacket it didn't need changing as often as the collar which was visible.  I've seen references to men buying collars as a separate item in novels published in the early part of the 20th century.  With the advent of ready to wear driving down the cost of the shirt we've gone back to collars that are attached.  David Coffin has examples in his books of detachable collars.

pfaff260

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Re: 1939 Dutch shirt pattern
« Reply #5 on: October 06, 2020, 07:58:33 AM »
Posaune and Theresa you are both wright. It is drawn with a seperate collar. And yes Schneiderfrei. I was over the moon when i found this. Taiolors in those days didn't care about shirts it seems. Even in the 50's Müller und Sohn did put the pattern of a mens shirt in the ladies books. And yes Posaune, the pattern was a translation from the Rundschau of those days. But the used the original drawings.

Schneiderfrei

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Re: 1939 Dutch shirt pattern
« Reply #6 on: October 06, 2020, 11:43:25 AM »
Here is a first go at a translation:

THE SHIRT.

Sizes:
Bust 96 48 cM.
Waist width 86/43 cM.
Neck width 38 cm.
Sleeve length 60 cm.
Whole length 176 cm.

Calculation of the auxiliary dimensions.

The back height for normal figures. which have a normal posture. are calculated to ¼ of half the chest width, plus 12 cM.

The armhole depth is in the same cases 2 cm. taller. The measurements used for this setup are: back height 24 cm .. armhole depth 26 cm.

For ALL figures and postures the diameter of the armhole is ¼ of half the upper width plus 3 cm. for ease.  In this case 15 cM.

For normal figures and postures, chest width and back width are found by subtracting from half of the upper width the armhole diameter without increment and dividing the remainder in half, adding 2½ cm. for convenience (20½ cm.).

The waist length is equal to 1/4 of a person's entire height.

Shirt length is usually about 50 cm. below the waist.

pfaff260

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Re: 1939 Dutch shirt pattern
« Reply #7 on: October 06, 2020, 04:50:10 PM »
Thank you Schneiderfrei. I'm impressed!

Hendrick

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Re: 1939 Dutch shirt pattern
« Reply #8 on: October 06, 2020, 07:59:08 PM »
Thank you for this rarity...

posaune

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Re: 1939 Dutch shirt pattern
« Reply #9 on: October 07, 2020, 12:20:04 AM »
Here in Germany shirts were sewn from Weißnäherinnen. Means sewing white garments like underwear, shirts  you name it.
Much was done in home work. The women got the cutted parts and they sewed them at home. Many children were involved. (No included S.A.!!!)
lg Posaune

Hendrick

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Re: 1939 Dutch shirt pattern
« Reply #10 on: October 07, 2020, 07:37:20 AM »
That sounds like the dutch "small leathergoods industry", some of that exists until today...