Author Topic: Irons  (Read 650 times)

supercilious

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Irons
« on: July 25, 2020, 03:34:51 PM »
After years of heartbreak caused by leaky gravity irons, I have resorted to using cheap home irons with temperature adjustment and a spray bottle or paintbrush to wet the fabric.

I am building my new studio set up and have decided to invest in an iron-- and have seen mentions of dry heavy (internal boiler?) tailors irons-- I'm hoping to get more info about these tools-- and if they are versatile. My hope is to have something that will work best with light to midweight woolens and silk and available to use on heavier stuff or synthetics on rarer occasion. Where to start looking?

Thanks

Thom Bennett

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Re: Irons
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2020, 08:19:16 PM »
Personally I just use a heavy dry iron with either a dauber, spray bottle, brush, or finger to wet the cloth. I have a domestic dry iron I use for linings.
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posaune

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Re: Irons
« Reply #2 on: July 27, 2020, 12:29:38 AM »
I have an italian iron
https://www.bieffeitalia.it/ferro-da-stiro-stir-vapor-bf054/
best brand I had till now. Normal water is used.
lg
posaune

Hendrick

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Re: Irons
« Reply #3 on: July 27, 2020, 04:45:23 AM »

I have one of those... Love it. But they did tell me to use water-softener, however. I know it sounds like something from Monty Python but the stuff is called "didecyldimenthylammoniumchloride". Needless to say the label says "keep away from children". I use about a coffee spoon per kettle.

Thom Bennett

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Re: Irons
« Reply #4 on: July 28, 2020, 01:25:10 AM »

I have one of those... Love it. But they did tell me to use water-softener, however. I know it sounds like something from Monty Python but the stuff is called "didecyldimenthylammoniumchloride". Needless to say the label says "keep away from children". I use about a coffee spoon per kettle.

Just use demineralised or distilled water saves the hassle. Yes that is the make of my heavy dry iron.
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pfaff260

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    • http://menfash.us/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Tailoring-Advice-for-Men-Suits-6.jpg
Re: Irons
« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2020, 02:22:12 PM »
I do the same as Tom,0,39 euro cent per liter at the local supermarket. My teacher used carbattery water wich she got from her sons garage. But it's more expensive.

posaune

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Re: Irons
« Reply #6 on: July 29, 2020, 02:21:50 AM »
With some irons there is a remark that you should not fill in distilled water. The iron would spit otherwise.  Who knows??
In the italian brand there is build in a cupper kettle. I decalc (word?) mine  3 monthly with vinegar. Had a bit wear and tear at the braided coating of the hose. Something I could repair myself. And I can get each spare part if reps are necessary.  Mine runs some years now without
lg
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Thom Bennett

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Re: Irons
« Reply #7 on: July 30, 2020, 08:08:58 PM »
Well I never knew that little tidbit of information about distilled water, I'll have to look in to that. Thanks.
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Prinze96

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Re: Irons
« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2020, 12:09:53 PM »
 Thom,

Those tailored class was not wasted on you. You hit the nail on the head. The process of pressing the garment fabric is to use a dry heavy iron on a cloth cover over the expensive woollen.  Next a sponge dauber gently wipe the cloth wet then the iron is place down protector cloth.   

 For a heavy Iron, they would use a heavy old electric iron cut off the cord.  To heat the iron they would put a metal plate on a electric hot plate and place the heavy iron on that surface. They would heat up to whatever the temperature they need to be on to do the job.

Water , they boil the water since the water was so pure from the Rocky Mountain. And let it sit to room temperature.

Cheers