Author Topic: High quality woven shirt interfacing / interlining by the metre (DHJ Chargeurs)  (Read 857 times)

Dunc

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Many of you will have seen me talking about this over on the "old" C&T forum, but I thought I'd duplicate the info over here just in case...

After much searching, I have finally managed to locate a supplier for cut lengths of both fusible and non-fusible woven shirt interfacing from DHJ Chargeurs, who will sell to private buyers and ship internationally. This is very high quality stuff, made in France. The supplier is an Italian firm called Chemital srl, and their interfacings can be found here. (The also offer many other useful items in bulk, such as collar stays, buttons, and various packaging items, although I have not yet bought any of these.) You need to register with them online before you can see prices or order, but this only takes a couple of minutes.

The interfacings I have bought from them so far are from the Fusetop (fusible) and Mellosan (non-fusible) ranges. I have not yet investigated the Polystar range, although I believe these are also fusibles.

They currently offer Mellosan in three weights, of which I have tried two. The 285BC is a medium weight, while the 29NC is a heavy weight. Both are very supple, in an excellent optical white.

The Fusetop is available in 4 weights: 160 (heavy), 285 (medium), 930 (light) and 6458 (extra light). The 160 is also available in two finishes (soft and extra soft), of which I've only tried the soft. Additionally, the 160 is available in either optical or natural white, while the 930 is available in optical white, natural white, light blue, and grey. All are of a very high quality.

While I don't have precise fusing specifications, I don't think it would be possible to fuse the Fusetop adequately with an iron - you need a heat press or fusing machine. I'm currently fusing at around 175 deg C for 15 seconds, under as much pressure as my press can deliver without becoming difficult to open and close, and the results seem very good (although I have yet to test them with repeated laundry cycles).

Their checkout system seems to struggle with international orders (or it did the last time I tried), but they do respond fairly promptly to enquires made via the contact form on the website. Shipping for a small order (1m each of 4 different interfacings) to the UK was €14.90 and only took a couple of days.

TTailor

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Thanks so much for this information!

Dunc

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My pleasure - it's nice to be able to contribute something!

BTW, I noticed that in your "in search of" post from a couple of years back, you mentioned that the interfacing you used to get had something printed in blue on one selvage... I think that very probably means it was DHJ, since theirs have "Made in France" printed in blue on one selvage.

Schneiderfrei

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Yes it has 'Made in France' on it. Thank you for clearing that up.

Petruchio

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So, I have some major issues with my fusable interlinings from Chargeur, so I thought I just reopen the thread instead of flooding the forum with new topics.

I started using fusables a while ago, since I really prefer the look and feel to the non-fusable I obtained from Acorn fabrics a while ago (let alone they are easier to work with). Since then, it was a gradual path to frustration. Despite the warnings on the forum I was of the stupid opinion that I of course can fuse the interlining with an iron, which unsurprisingly turned out to be a desaster, so I invested in the cheapest heat press I could find (https://www.naehpark.com/hobbysqueezy-transferpresse.html). The results still weren't satisfactory and you can see bubbling after the first launder. So I wrote to Chargeur to ask for the specifications


Altough the necessary pressure didn't strike me as unachievable even with this press, I invested in another more suitable heat press (https://www.ricoo.eu/ricoo-transferpresse-t-shirt-maschine-textildruck-automatische-aeoeffnung-t438m/a-10007/). So I thought the struggle was over since you can adjust the pressure on this one, but I was wrong again and after dozen tests there is still some bubbling even after the first launder.

So the question is: Does anybody have similar problems with this specific interlining or does anybody have any information on the press itself and if or how you can achieve the necessary pressure? The press itself closes with a magnet who might not be able to hold the necessary force, but I had the same problem when i closed it manually as well. Are there any fusables who require less pressure?

TTailor

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I have some of the DHJ heavy shirt interfacing that I bought 10 years ago and it adheres so much better than the newer interfacing we have at work.
We have a press at work and I use it, but it just wont stick as well as I think it should.

What I have been doing is treating it like a sew in.one option is to cut it to size(nett)  and machine baste it in place on the fabric. Eventually it will be caught in the edge/topstitching at which point I remove the machine basting.
The other option is to apply it (nett) by heat press to a very light weight non fusible. The non fusible  interfacing has the seam allowances, and if the heavy interfacing eventually bubbles, it is not noticeable because it is fused to an inner layer.

theresa in tucson

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Terri, that is a good suggestion!  I have some fusible that I bought at JoAnn's that bubbles. I will have to give that a try.

Petruchio

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Thanks Terri, I will definitely give it a try. However, I figure if I fuse it to an interlining that is still "floating" inside the collar I won't achieve the distinguished look of a fused collar, but just benefit from the stiffness of the fused interlining. Are there any other fusables one can try, that are of good quality and might need a little less pressure?

TTailor

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The only other thing I can think of trying would be to use a product like stitch wichery or heat and bond/wonder under.
Stitch wich is a product that come as yardage and bonds two layers of fabric together using heat. You lay it in between two fabrics and press, fusing the layers together.

Heat and bond, is a paper backed bonding product. It comes in different weights. It allows you to press it to a single fabric, then peel away the paper, and bond it to a second fabric.

You could try using one of these products to fuse the heavy interfacing to your fabric. In other words you are applying an extra glue product to your heavy fusible.

My experience with stitch wich and shirting fabric is that it may give a texture when fused. Not sure about the heat n bond.
You would have to try a sample to see if it works for you.

posaune

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As I think you speak german, try to ask Orag München.
https://www.oraghaus.com/shop/rosshaar-fixiereinlagen-vlieseline/
scroll down to sanfor:
Artikel 150 mittlere Qualität zum fixieren 170 gr./qm, 155-170 Grad,/2-3,5 bar/ 12-15 sec.
lg
posaune

spookietoo

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Has anyone tried the fusibles from Biasbespoke.com recently?

Dunc

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The second press linked looks like it probably ought to be able to achieve the necessary pressure - dial it up until you can barely pull it closed.

There's also the question of temperature and dwell time... I fuse at 175 C for 15 seconds, which seems to work pretty well. (Can't see the specs on the linked image as postimg is giving me an error right now.)

Finally, you also need to make absolutely sure that there is no lint, dust, or thread fragments on the surfaces to be fused.

Terri - DHJ do a range of heavy sew-in intefacings as well (MELOSAN) which are probably a better option if you're not actually fusing them.