Author Topic: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.  (Read 1565 times)

Dunc

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #15 on: April 09, 2019, 09:40:30 PM »
Also maybe worth mentioning that I get my interfacing from Acorn Fabrics, who offer 5 different weights and finishes of woven non-fusible interfacing, from 125 gsm up to 280 gsm... That covers most requirements without needing to mess about combining multiple layers.

Greger

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #16 on: April 10, 2019, 09:46:57 AM »
Why not padstitch two layers together? Then you can shape it.

mysewingpleasure

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #17 on: April 10, 2019, 05:50:06 PM »
Dunc, I go online and search for Acorn Fabric, it sells interior design fabric .... Did I mess up something? there is not any interfacing at all!!! Would you please provide more information!
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posaune

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #18 on: April 10, 2019, 09:00:40 PM »
Peterle, the thin layer of interfacing acts more like a "interlining", prevents shrinking.  I use it as first layer then above the thick interfacing with no seam allowance.
When no iron interfaching ist prefered I baste the interfacing with big stitches on the collar. You must pretread very carefull both fabric and interfacing when doing it that way.
Some people glue the thin interface above the thick sew-in interface. And fasten it in this way. And they will not get those ugly ripples after washing when the ironing on was not correct done. The glue dots are in the seam allowances. Still have to try this.
Greger, I would not padstitch a shirt collar. Too much work and it will not take all the washing in my opinion.
lg
posaune

Hendrick

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #19 on: April 11, 2019, 08:26:19 AM »
Peterle, the thin layer of interfacing acts more like a "interlining", prevents shrinking.  I use it as first layer then above the thick interfacing with no seam allowance.
When no iron interfaching ist prefered I baste the interfacing with big stitches on the collar. You must pretread very carefull both fabric and interfacing when doing it that way.
Some people glue the thin interface above the thick sew-in interface. And fasten it in this way. And they will not get those ugly ripples after washing when the ironing on was not correct done. The glue dots are in the seam allowances. Still have to try this.
Greger, I would not padstitch a shirt collar. Too much work and it will not take all the washing in my opinion.
lg

Hi Posane,

In doing research on shirts I actually “reverse engineered” a lot of shirts from the 50’s, meaning I took them apart. Although they were mostly American industrial shirts, there was nice craftmanship involved... Most interlinings were “floating” and often the cuffs’ interlinings were cut to bias. Not the collars. Interestingly, the interlinings were stitched to the top collarvand cuffs at an 8th of an inch and the seam itself would, of course, be larger. Still, the thickness of the interlining will raise the edge of the collar and cuffs nicely. The interlining was a rather thick fluffy, canvas like material. Because of the thickness of these interlinings, the difference in neck-curves between the top- and undercollar was considerable, about a quarter of an inch. Shirts I surgically took apart were branded Towncraft, Brooks Brothers and McGregor from that period...
posaune

Schneiderfrei

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #20 on: April 11, 2019, 09:39:49 AM »
Mysewingpleasure,

Here is a link for the Acorn Accessories page:

https://www.acornfabrics.com/accessories/buttons-and-interlining

It's not listed under fabrics but accessories.

G

mysewingpleasure

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #21 on: April 11, 2019, 03:53:56 PM »
Schneiderfrei, thank you for the link. Which one should I take for the casual shirt, not as stiff as the ones in 70s and 80s, for young people?
A sewing mom

Schneiderfrei

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #22 on: April 12, 2019, 12:25:33 AM »
Goodness, that is such a personal choice.

Casual shirt? - at one time I made my collars/cuffs without any interlining at all.  Very casual :)

Now I am using about 200 gm/mtr Mellosan (a french one). It's a pleasant weight.

When I run out of that I will likely go for Acorn, since it looks easy order.

G

theresa in tucson

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #23 on: April 12, 2019, 07:13:49 AM »
My Sewing, if you read any of David P. Coffin's articles (you can find him on line) he recommends auditioning several types of interfacing in a cuff or a collar to get a desired effect.  If you are sewing for someone, ask them what they like that is already in the closet and why.  Then you can target a duplication.  Barring that do some snoop shopping and look at what's out there in ready to wear (RTW) or buy some samples from the thrift shops and tear them apart.  I've learned a lot from taking apart worn out garments.  In RTW menswear, except at the lowest price point, quality across the board in woven garments is pretty good.  Can't say the same for womens wear, though. 

For my "work shirts" I use Pam Erny's (Fashion Sewing Supply) "Shirt Crisp" light or medium in the collar and cuffs and I use a plain muslin cut on the bias for the front button stand (sewn on placket) that I heavily starch.

mysewingpleasure

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #24 on: April 12, 2019, 08:47:24 AM »
Theresa, thank you for your suggestion, I will try these methods as I move along. I have borrowed David P. Coffin's books from local library last year. 

Another question, what kind of starch you suggest?
A sewing mom

Schneiderfrei

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #25 on: April 12, 2019, 09:30:51 AM »
Starch is generally frowned upon in these pages, he he ;). It tends to expose the cloth to damage when it is so stiff and brittle.

Theresa in Tuscon is right, trying several is the best idea, as per David Coffin. I had assumed that you wanted to oder a minimum amount for economical reasons. 

As I have done you could order some mother of pearl buttons in the same order to cut down on shipping. Though as far as buttons go, these are exquisite, and not much more expensive:

http://prestigebuttons.com/mother-of-pearl-shirt-buttons

Graham

mysewingpleasure

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #26 on: April 12, 2019, 02:10:29 PM »
Schneiderfrei, thanks for the link to buy Mother of Pearl buttons. Yes, my son loves the pearl buttons and the buffalo horn suit buttons - good quality material! That is a good start. By the way, I would buy the set of swatch and explore which one is best match with the fabric that I am going to use.
A sewing mom

theresa in tucson

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #27 on: April 12, 2019, 02:28:54 PM »
I just bought the grocery store brand of starch in a spray bottle (not aerosol) and I have some "Best Press" sizing I bought from Nancy's Notions a while back.  I have yet to break into the bottle of liquid starch but will when I run out of what I have.  I use the starch selectively, only on certain areas that I need crisp until they are sewn.

Hendrick

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #28 on: April 13, 2019, 08:06:45 AM »
I umm, ordered a lifetimes worth supply of oldfashioned starch in powder. “Volendammertjes” brand starch costs about 15 euro per kilo. I mix it with boiled water and spray it on with a plant sprayer. It will probably last me way past my pension....

theresa in tucson

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #29 on: April 13, 2019, 11:50:23 AM »
Hendrick, I am envious.  I remember helping my mother mix starch out of a box and then dunking the clothes into the batch before whirling them in the washer and hanging them on the line.  I went hunting for that same starch and could only find the aerosol cans or spray bottles before I finally found a bottle of the liquid starch concentrate at the Super WalMart.  I know you can make a usable starch from corn starch but it does not store well and one of the quilting boards recommends mixing an equal part of cheap vodka with an equal part water as a substitute for "Best Press".  It's called "Quilter's Moonshine".  I have yet to try it but may just for grins.  My personal use for cheap vodka is in pie dough to take the place of some of the ice water.  When the "Best Press" bottle runs dry I just may mix up a batch and see how it does.