Author Topic: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.  (Read 1028 times)

mysewingpleasure

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Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« on: April 04, 2019, 04:46:48 PM »
I watched the 2 videos Posted by: Sebastian Hoofs, I especially like to learn how to sew more professional tailoring method. It seems to me that the zipper is well-hidden inside the fry by at least half of an inch, which is very neat and adorable. I find that ladies` pants are usually set in only a quarter of an inch. However, I do not understand even one single word. Please help me to draft the seam allowance of the front center where the fry and the extension are. If possible, please refer a video about the construction of the waistband, I cannot understand written tutorial, because I do not understand all the vocabularies and the abbreviations.
Henry Hall has suggested Cabrera's tailoring book - the 1983 menswear edition in Apprentice's forum, I learn the basic idea, a video will be great. I wish Sebastian Hoofs will generously demonstrate with the wasitband, even I might not understand his speech.
A sewing mom

TTailor

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2019, 09:56:27 PM »
Well technically you dont need to draft anything special at the CF fly area.
You can leave a larger seam allowance to work with. On the left front you will sew the fly facing on the CF line, on the right, sew the zipper your preferred distance from the CF line.
Trying out techniques on a sample is a good way to work through various possibilities.

peterle

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2019, 10:27:07 PM »
For the zip I refer to this video:

First iron the zip with lots of steam to preshrink it.
Left side: Hoof does a sewing allowance of 1cm, on the left fly but sews the facing seam just 0,5-0,75 inwards from the edge, so the seam can be ironed backwards and dissapears.

Right side: Hoof adds "an additional cm" to the right topside above the notch so the zip can dissappear in the fly. So the sewing allowance adds up to 2cm from the notch upwards. Than he sews the top to the underlap by matching the edge of the zip (not the edge of the underlap!5:35) and the edge of the topside.

After closing the crotch seam (notch downwards) he sews the zip to the left topside. For this you have to mark the center front on the right topside, wich should be 1cm inwards from the zip seam, but you better measure it from the sideseam(8:07). After matching the left topside with the mark and after basting you can see exatcly where to sew the zip to the left topside facing (9:29).
Sew the facing to the topside: chalk line, baste, sew. In the last few cm also catch the underlap (12:28). You have to interrupt the seam when you sew it with the machine.
The underlap facing (15:15) is cut bias of pocketing fabric and wide enough to cover the underlap. Itīs also long enough to cover the the hole center front down to the seam crossing (shown in 17:38). Itīs tacked down there in the end to make the whole inside front area neat.

mysewingpleasure

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2019, 05:25:54 PM »
Peterle, thank you so much for explain the details of how to construct the zipper. With your description, I understand a lot better, I really appreciate your help.

The other thing I am happy that, from the video, I learn how to eliminate some of the bias tape at the bottom of the fry , so it won't be as bulky I usually bias to the end.

 I always have problems with the cuffs with the split sleeves, upper collars and under collars joining the neckline.  The many layers of seam allowance at the turning corners look ugly and poor finished.  As a beginner of men's wear, I am eager to learn tailoring ( the more dedicate and elegant workmanship). Please refer more of these kind of videos
A sewing mom

mysewingpleasure

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2019, 05:33:36 PM »
TTailor, thank you for your suggestion. I definitely will make a sample this weekend. I think I will understand more with step by step following the video. In modern technology world,  learning a new technique is a lot "easier" than 20 or 30 years ago, with the help of experienced people, we can learn at our own space and place, without having to pay institution fee, which otherwise most people cannot afford. I feel I am blessed to become a member among so many experts and learn from you.
A sewing mom

peterle

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2019, 08:33:45 PM »

 I always have problems with the cuffs with the split sleeves, upper collars and under collars joining the neckline.  The many layers of seam allowance at the turning corners look ugly and poor finished.  As a beginner of men's wear, I am eager to learn tailoring ( the more dedicate and elegant workmanship). Please refer more of these kind of videos

Are you talking about shirt collars and cuffs?

These videos show a lot of tricks to get nice collar tips and well attached cuffs and collar stands: in particular notice how the Sewing allowances of the collar stand and the cuffs are sewn in place in a first step.




mysewingpleasure

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #6 on: April 07, 2019, 03:44:49 PM »
Peterle,
I can't say enough that how much I appreciate your recommending the videos of each step of making a shirt, I have learned so many "secrets' of how to get those four parts together. I have never seen such as helpful ones before, they drop my jaws and my eyes wide open. It is truly amazing.

I have a question : what is the white interfacing proper name? I live in Vancouver, BC, Canada, I had tried to find the interfacing such as this one.  It is pretty sturdy, but it is fusible. There is a lot of interfacing of non-woven fusible, which is not sturdy. What I am using mostly is Tricot, it is woven, it is like knit-y net, which is very good but not at all stiff enough that I have to include the seam allowance to keep it attached to the clothe.

I cannot find anything like this even I visited a few "Chained-brand-name-shores" selling sewing notions. I planed to buy online, however, I do not know what is the proper name of it. I tried to go Chinese, e.g. Ailbaba or Taobao, I do not which one to order, there are so many different kinds. Please help me to figure it out so that I can use this kind of interfacing for collars and cuffs without seam allowance to avoid all the bulky corners.

Thank you again for your time and patience with me.
A sewing mom

peterle

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #7 on: April 07, 2019, 07:30:12 PM »
Sorry, I donīt know, what the man in the video uses.

I prefer a non fusible for shirts, and to get the right grade of stiffness i take a non fusible (collar shaped with sewing allowance) and iron on a fusible with the exact shape of the collar. Then I sew the collar and clip the sewing allowance of the interfacing as close as possible to the stitches. so the interfacing doesn'tīt add any bulkyness.

theresa in tucson

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #8 on: April 07, 2019, 11:22:38 PM »
My Sewing Pleasure, try Pam Erny at Fashion Sewing Supply.  She's in new York and sells three different weights of shirt interfacing from very, very stiff to soft and supple.  I have used her interfacing for shirts and have been pleased.

mysewingpleasure

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #9 on: April 08, 2019, 05:11:19 PM »
My Sewing Pleasure, try Pam Erny at Fashion Sewing Supply.  She's in new York and sells three different weights of shirt interfacing from very, very stiff to soft and supple.  I have used her interfacing for shirts and have been pleased.
Theresa, thank you for providing the supply shore, I went online to check it out, I am going to purchase the swatch set to test it out, it will be great help.
A sewing mom

posaune

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #10 on: April 08, 2019, 08:11:05 PM »
Peterle , I think, you have twisted your words. The non fusiable(stiff fabric)  you cut without the seam allowances. I do it that way.

What I ever admire seeing videos from Asia how they cut out example: undercollar. Just a piece of fabric and of we go. He needs about 80 minutes to sew a shirt. I need for the sewing alone 6 hours.
lg
posaune

Dunc

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #11 on: April 08, 2019, 09:49:23 PM »
I use non-fusible shirt interfacing, and I've sewn it both with and without seam allowances. Either way works... Sometimes I actually want the extra thickness from the interfacing seam allowance, to give a slightly raised appearance to the edge of the collar once it's top stitched - in this case, it's important to trim the seam allowance so that it stays entirely inside the top stitching. (A rotary cutter is good for this.)

I no longer take peterle's approach of sewing the interfacing with a seam allowance and then trimming it as close to the stitching as possible, although I've done it that way in the past - these days, I cut the interfacing exactly to size and just rely on the liberal use of a glue stick to keep it stuck to the top collar long enough to turn and top stitch it. However, if you wanted to do very narrow top stitching, it might be a good idea - otherwise you risk the collar interfacing coming loose inside the collar when its laundered. I've had that happen with the collar stand interfacing a couple of times - now I do an extra line of top stitching around the edge of the collar (where it sits inside the collar stand) to prevent that.

Greger

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #12 on: April 09, 2019, 09:23:39 AM »
Thicker can be cut exact. Then sew a thin piece to that, which will be  part of the seam to  hold it in place (that is along the edges).

mysewingpleasure

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #13 on: April 09, 2019, 10:49:43 AM »
Dunc, I never thought of using glue stick, I need to give it a try. I have just watched a Youtube this afternoon, it is amazingly exactly what Peterle said.



Unfortunately, I don't understand a single word he says, he explains with details, I wish I can understand but I see how he uses the 2 layer of inferfacing, (there is another video shows how to press the layers together) , he constructs  the collar to make it curve nicely. I am so happy to have learned more and more. I have a delicious treat today.

I have another question, what is the plastic that the man uses in his video. It can be machine stitching through, it is interesting, and how he cuts it in a half round shape.
A sewing mom

peterle

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Re: Professional waistband of a men`s pants.
« Reply #14 on: April 09, 2019, 08:00:10 PM »
No Posaune, I use the fusible only to make the non fusible stiffer.  How do you proceed then? Do You fuse the sewing allowances to the collar fabric? Or do You just sew it without ironing and cut away the SA of the fusible? And how do you iron the larger fusible to the smaller non fusible? Doesnīt it stick to the iron to the ironing board?

Using a glue stick is a good idea. Although I use this method always when doing cap visors, I never did it with collars. Entrenched habits hinders brain use...