Author Topic: 'Avant Garde' Tailoring  (Read 402 times)

supercilious

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'Avant Garde' Tailoring
« on: April 04, 2019, 07:20:35 AM »
Sorry to start a a controversial thread so early into joining-- I understand "artisanal designers" like this are not part of the common culture on this Forum-- That being said, there is a lot of discussion elsewhere on the Artistic Value of these makers, but not technique and construction. Is anyone else interested around here? I'm talking about the likes of Geoffrey B Small, Carol Christian Poell etc.

Some of the technique although not traditional is remarkable, especially the former in his consideration of fabrics and quality... A description of his garments often sound like Dickens
"hand dyed superlux handwoven Tessitura La Colombina silk, linen & cotton with fully handpadstitched canvas fronts, hand made shoulder pads, buttonholes & buttons."














Schneiderfrei

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Re: 'Avant Garde' Tailoring
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2019, 09:26:51 AM »
I hope you understand that this a bit teasing:

. . . . silk, linen & cotton with fully handpadstitched canvas fronts, hand made shoulder pads, buttonholes & buttons."

That sounds more like 50 years behind the times. ;p

G

Which is just what I like doing.

supercilious

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Re: 'Avant Garde' Tailoring
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2019, 11:47:46 AM »
Well why I group these two together, and plenty of more out there— is their commitment to technique not commonly practiced anywhere else (at the same scale)

While it is old fashioned, I do believe a commitment to the hand (including the fabric itself) is a very modern business model (albeit existing in a very small niche) I think this also lends itself to innovatio, for example completely hand working pockets, leads to finding new forms of pockets. GBS has ‘invented’ a few like circular welts, pleated pockets etc. I’m sure some out there would do the same but perhaps not with the intent of finding new solutions

The second suits I posted are pretty interesting to me in that they have a completely taped canvas... being very new to that aspect of clothesmaking, I can’t tell if that is kangaroo canvassing

Schneiderfrei

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Re: 'Avant Garde' Tailoring
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2019, 07:35:28 PM »
I hope you are right supercilious, in regard to a widening interest in handwork and care in craftmanship.  I like that myself, or I would not be heere on this forum.  Although I am from Australia, could you explain what kangaroo canvassing, I guess it is a perjorative term. :)

I like the innovative pockets very much. The hdden ones behind the lapel and curious curves are great.

And, yes I think you are correct, in that when you are focussed on handwork, which I do when I want control of the seams, and I may lack expertise on the machine, you can get more involved in innovation.

G

supercilious

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Re: 'Avant Garde' Tailoring
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2019, 03:53:27 AM »
Haha an appropriation of the term Kangaroo Court (which I believe was of Australian Invention)
As Mr. Dior said (I believe), creativity is born at the sewing machine/ atelier...
Perhaps I will post elsewhere, but as a novice weaver I'm working on a few projects now from the ground up so to say.

Hendrick

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Re: 'Avant Garde' Tailoring
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2019, 05:59:49 AM »
Welcome, and thanks for touching this subject. The influence of these designers is not to be underestimated… G.B. Small has inspired many and indeed some of the greatest designers, but not only them; just think of the influence on the likes of Tim Burton.... And don't forget, artisanry is the deeper reason why most of us are on this forum, I guess...

supercilious

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Re: 'Avant Garde' Tailoring
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2019, 11:46:42 AM »
I'm glad he is not unheard of on this side of the internet, also, I've never made that connection-- is that a quote from somewhere? I just assumed they had a shared affinity for (lack of better words) the Arte Povera aesthetic.
Perhaps I phrased the intro to this thread a bit clumsily, but I find that there is so much (undiscussed) technical work out there there that steps outside of, from my opinion, a rather homogenous school of thought within tailoring. Yes, some tailors do padding by hand, some put paste in buttonholes, but I don't know if there are many who question what it means to be an artisan maker i.e. It seems that the proverbial tailor is solely concerned with the garment to the context of the individual, but not what it can mean in a broader scale.

I have been thinking a lot about tailors recently, today on the way to class, I thought God ruins a tailor's posture as an exhibition of their modesty.
(Of course I mean this with the utmost respect)

Hendrick

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Re: 'Avant Garde' Tailoring
« Reply #7 on: April 07, 2019, 04:22:18 AM »
Tailoring, as such, is a craft or an applied art at best to most people. Of course there are fashion influences that gradually trickle down into thiis craft. But note that style is of utmost importance, certainly to those who find themselves in “formal situations”. That style is mostly defined by conformities, not fashion. In other words, most clients visit tailors not for fashion as such, but for personalised refinement. Some go further than others but the fine line between craft and art is seldom crossed. Personaly, I love Thom Browns work. It’s quirky and sophisticated and immaculaty executed. However, it is fashion no matter what. And I guess that most bespoke clients are looking for a certain timelesness. I also believe that G.B. Smalls’ work is closer to costuming than to tailoring...

Just my two pennies, cheers

Greger

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Re: 'Avant Garde' Tailoring
« Reply #8 on: April 07, 2019, 12:16:43 PM »
The history of tailoring, if looking at paintings, is rather wild from today's perspective. There are not many tailors left. And few, today, want to step out in new territory. One picture reminds me of steampunk. Steampunk is play clothes. The tailoring world has made lots of play clothes throughout the centuries. It depends on the interest of the tailor. Making clothes for boys is far from businesses suits. Teens are not interested in business suits. How many twenty and thirty year olds have been reprimanded for wearing clothes to fashionable for work? And, who made those clothes? In the past wealthy children did not go to stores to buy clothes. And they were all completely hand sewn. Many tailoring guilds would not consider machined clothing up to the standards of quality clear into the 1920s.  About ten years ago my mom died saying machined clothing is not tailored. The old standard's, are they wrong? Machined clothes are great for cheaper clothing. The pictured clothes above are not high standard, hand sewn or not. As far as art goes tailoring has to be art, or it is not tailoring. Art is many things.