Author Topic: Women's trouser drafts  (Read 1577 times)

Dunc

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Re: Women's trouser drafts
« Reply #15 on: March 29, 2019, 01:51:29 AM »
I recently made a short-sleeved shirt, with a tapered sleeve... To deal with the combination of a 1" double turned sleeve hem and the flat-felled seam, I actually sewed the hem up before cutting the fabric to shape. That way, the hem matches the taper of the sleeve perfectly.  ;)

TTailor

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Re: Women's trouser drafts
« Reply #16 on: March 29, 2019, 09:41:03 PM »
The other option is to face the hem.

Futura

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Re: Women's trouser drafts
« Reply #17 on: March 31, 2019, 02:35:18 PM »
Thanks for the suggestions! A facing was my first thought on how to handle the curve easily. I will need to tape a bit of paper back onto the draft to add the hem, as I already cut it out without allowances anywhere. Or else just draw out another draft.

I'm going to try 6 cm long instead of just 2 cm... Not quite daring enough just yet.

Brilliant stealing futura ;p

I have the entire scanned 2 pages of instructions for the draft. I think I saved all of the images from that listing. ;)

Greger

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Re: Women's trouser drafts
« Reply #18 on: March 31, 2019, 04:46:27 PM »
Hems are added before cutting the cloth. They are not on tailor patterns. How many tailors include style and fashion lines on paper patterns? A customer may want this one time, and something else next. These things are easily added to the cloth before cutting.

Hendrick

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Re: Women's trouser drafts
« Reply #19 on: April 01, 2019, 09:03:24 AM »
Hems are added before cutting the cloth. They are not on tailor patterns. How many tailors include style and fashion lines on paper patterns? A customer may want this one time, and something else next. These things are easily added to the cloth before cutting.

Agrred, totally! I dug out some older “ready to cut”  patterns recently. With added seam allowances and such they are really hard to rework. I ended up cutting off the allowances and such to be able to retouch  them. Interestingly, companies using digitising systems to enter them into their systems usually also prefer “net” patterns...

Cheers, Hendrick

Futura

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Re: Women's trouser drafts
« Reply #20 on: April 01, 2019, 11:29:33 AM »
I was going by Hutch’s advice that this type of shorts pattern would have the hem allowance added to it. Maybe I misunderstood? Fortunately the pattern pieces are small enough that I can experiment around a little without fear of wasting too many resources!

I usually cut my patterns out of kraft paper, without any allowances. (I never found a good way to store the massive roll of tag I bought. It’s too cumbersome to move around in my small workspace.) Within dressmaking, some materials are impossible to chalk around. For those I’ve had great results using vellum tracing paper, with the seam allowances added onto the pattern, pinned to a single layer.

posaune

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Re: Women's trouser drafts
« Reply #21 on: April 01, 2019, 11:40:12 PM »
As you have a curved hem and the side seams going like this \ /  You can do only a small hem (there is not enough space for a large hem). You mirrow the angle of the side seam to the seam allowance to get enough hem width The hem will be small and the fabric must be stretchable with the iron. (I would work here with a bias stripe of lining as facing)
lg
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hutch--

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Re: Women's trouser drafts
« Reply #22 on: April 02, 2019, 11:01:18 PM »
Something that may matter, how much stretch or give does the fabric you are going to use have. If it was like a non stretch fabric, the hem design would be a bit more complicated but if it has any reasonable stretch you can handle it to accommodate the stretch which would be much easier.
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Futura

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Re: Women's trouser drafts
« Reply #23 on: April 08, 2019, 01:10:08 PM »
Thank you for the clear description, Posaune. :) I think on this first pair of shorts, I may finish the raw edge of the hem with a mock overlock stitch and then attempt a single fold upwards. It is a 10 oz brushed cotton bull denim, but I'm not yet sure how well it will respond to stretching.

Good point Hutch, the fabric will definitely dictate what hem I can use. I have some nicer quality 7 oz polyester/cotton twill I might use for another. Those will likely need a separate facing, as the fabric has no give to it.

The book I'm currently using says to use "non bias tape" to stabilize the curved opening of Western style pants pockets (and also along the top of a faced waistband). What kind of tape would be most appropriate without adding any bulk? My first thought was thin cotton twill tape, but the local fashion fabric store only carries polyester twill tape. I'm not sure if that will even adapt to a curved pocket opening...! Rayon seam binding seems too flimsy for shorts and pants intended for washable everyday wear.

Their instructions for a straight waistband call for a single layer of the outer fabric, with a lining and interfacing or grosgrain. What kind of lining fabric could be used for a durable finish? Could the same material also double as lining for the fly shield? The least offensive looking fabric I found was 100% cotton plain weave shirting. I don't know how well this will hold up to regular wear, though.

hutch--

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Re: Women's trouser drafts
« Reply #24 on: April 08, 2019, 04:11:45 PM »
What I have found with practice for the leg openings for shorts is a double fold, turn the hem under once, pin it carefully so its the same width all around, run a line of straight stitch to hold it in place then turn it again using the top edge of the first fold as a guide then face stitch it by whatever design you like to make the final leg edging. This ends up very strong but with a bit of give on the edge so they don't cut into your legs. With the basic pattern you must lengthen the legs by twice the amount of the hem width and keep in mind with the shape of the lower leg opening that it must fold twice.
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posaune

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Re: Women's trouser drafts
« Reply #25 on: April 08, 2019, 08:01:29 PM »
For pockets a.s.o I use for my private sewing old shirts which are out of use. I use it for the pockets and the waistband lining and the fly lining. The inside of the trousers are always an eye catcher. The shirts were washed a 1000 times it will not shrink. The pants - if washed - will. So I cut the lining in the bias.
For customers you can buy pocket lining.  This is from cotton called in the US I think shirting
lg
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