Author Topic: Men's Trouser Fit Check  (Read 45311 times)

tom bennett

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Re: Men's Trouser Fit Check
« Reply #180 on: February 02, 2017, 06:37:49 AM »
To be honest it doesn't make to much difference if the line flatten out slightly at the bottom. What you could do is to lay them top on underside and take a picture, from at the knee up.  Is the fly-run new or does this include inlay along with the already included seam allowance?  IMHO Jim I still feel that there is an issue with the seat seam and CB as I can see some very tight looking drag lines running down the seam. Can you feel the seam pulling up inside the trousers? As peterle suggested you could let the side seam down a bit by adding length at the waist to sort out the problem with the roping and collapsing, looking at the pattern I am not convinced that the side length is the real cause though could be part of the issue.  You do need to add a bit more length on the right side due to your high hip, you can't treat each side the same because of this.

I do think that your fronts are ballooning a bit to much, I think that you have drawn the side run a bit rounder than it needs to be.  Personally I would cut the left side a little smaller at the waist to compensate allowing the waist to sit level; you might have to change the run slightly.

jruley

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Re: Men's Trouser Fit Check
« Reply #181 on: February 02, 2017, 08:55:23 AM »

Is the fly-run new or does this include inlay along with the already included seam allowance?


The fly-run is not new.  The fly seam was drawn with 1/2" seam allowance added, the seat seam was drawn without.  The cut edge of the back piece is the old seat seam, the punched line is the new one.

To sort this all out, just follow the black line for the fly seam, then the red punched line for the seat seam.

posaune

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Re: Men's Trouser Fit Check
« Reply #182 on: February 02, 2017, 09:31:28 PM »
Yes I agree with Tom, the front fly has two little folds at the side. But this means experience with the curve of the front crotch. The crotch  does not hug the body too much fabric here. It happens in my opinion when the customer has a "belly" or a posture which mimick a belly as Jim's.
Jim, you can experience with your crotch curve - this requieres just test 2 seams. One sewed deeper. I would not go deeper I would drive the seat seam like you did but a bit more in direction side seam. But careful 0.5 cm is much in the area.

jruley

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Re: Men's Trouser Fit Check
« Reply #183 on: February 03, 2017, 02:59:40 AM »
I decided to try the alteration shown (dashed red line).  Slightly flatter seat and more seat length:



Here's how they look.  I think this gave the needed length at CB:









peterle

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Re: Men's Trouser Fit Check
« Reply #184 on: February 03, 2017, 03:45:04 AM »
I prefer the former version, the back looks cleaner.
 I would continue with the version 178 and adress the slanted hip. Reattach the waistband, making the right hip higher about 1cm and the left hip lower for about the same amount. Or even better, make the right hip higher for 1,75-2cm tapering to 0 at the left side seam.

Also the top sides changed in the new version. There are diagonal creases from zip end towards the pelvic bone.

posaune

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Re: Men's Trouser Fit Check
« Reply #185 on: February 03, 2017, 03:57:03 AM »
no - unrip it - not good. But you can see how a tiny alteration works in this area.
lg
posaune

jruley

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Re: Men's Trouser Fit Check
« Reply #186 on: February 03, 2017, 06:32:48 AM »
But you can see how a tiny alteration works in this area.

Very much so!

I would like to solve the problem using the CB seam if possible.  This way the alteration can be applied to the other pairs as well.  So before raising the waistband, I tried the alteration from #179 (scooping out just the flat spot at bottom of crotch curve):









I think the two sides hang about the same now.  Much of the apparent shortness on the right was probably just careless arrangement of the trousers and belt on my body.  Pretty hard to be consistent without belt loops :).

peterle

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Re: Men's Trouser Fit Check
« Reply #187 on: February 04, 2017, 03:33:51 AM »
Weīr working on a new pattern now. When you want to alter the old ones, alter the old ones.

The belt itself shows Your hip is slanted. So it should be regarded in the pattern. As you can see in the front pic, the waistband protrudes the belt more at the left side due to the lower left hip.

Nearly every picture set shows a shortness in the right side, so I think this is the natural fit. Arranging it "carefully" probably just veils the issues.

jruley

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Re: Men's Trouser Fit Check
« Reply #188 on: February 04, 2017, 01:31:20 PM »
The following changes were made:

Waistband raised, 0 at left side seam , 1/4" at CB and CF, 1/2" at right side seam.

Here's how they fit:









So, the score is peterle 1, Jim 0 :).

BTW the waistband was already slanted 1/2 in step #51.  So the right side is now a full inch higher than the left.

peterle

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Re: Men's Trouser Fit Check
« Reply #189 on: February 04, 2017, 09:00:41 PM »
Well, thatīs nice, isnīt it? Obviousely you need a full inch slanting. Would habve been easier with balance measures.

By this alteration we also lowerd the whole crotch ''/seat seam for 1/4" wich relaxes the whole area. The conclusion is, your rise measure was too short.

Do You like the silhouette of the trousers? I think the pair could profit from a smaller knee width. A matter of personal taste.

jruley

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Re: Men's Trouser Fit Check
« Reply #190 on: February 05, 2017, 01:17:57 AM »

Do You like the silhouette of the trousers? I think the pair could profit from a smaller knee width. A matter of personal taste.


I like the straight leg, especially for casual wear.  But I don't mind playing with the knee width at this stage to see what happens. 

How much smaller would you suggest?  Will this affect the seat area, or just the leg?

peterle

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Re: Men's Trouser Fit Check
« Reply #191 on: February 05, 2017, 03:37:47 AM »
looking on your pattern of #69 I think especially your top side knee is quite wide. Itīs usually smaller than the underside knee line, yourīs seems equal. The top side knee should be smaller for the same amount it is in the hem at least. So take out more at the top sides.

Generally I would take out about 4-6 cm per leg wich is 2-3cm per seam.  The new seam line will fade out to the crotch point at the inseam and to the hip line at the out seam. A smaller knee will probably also take some of the superfluous length  under the butt.

jruley

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Re: Men's Trouser Fit Check
« Reply #192 on: February 05, 2017, 03:53:36 AM »
looking on your pattern of #69 I think especially your top side knee is quite wide. Itīs usually smaller than the underside knee line, yourīs seems equal. The top side knee should be smaller for the same amount it is in the hem at least. So take out more at the top sides.

This is an optical illusion caused by not having the camera square with the cutting table.  The underside is in the background, so the perspective makes it look smaller.  In fact the back side has the same extra width at the knee and the hem, as shown in the sketch here:

http://movsd.com/BespokeCutter/index.php?topic=56.0

(and yes, I checked the actual pattern, and didn't manage to screw this up with all the changes! :))  )

Generally I would take out about 4-6 cm per leg wich is 2-3cm per seam.  The new seam line will fade out to the crotch point at the inseam and to the hip line at the out seam. A smaller knee will probably also take some of the superfluous length  under the butt.

I was thinking about this thread:

http://www.cutterandtailor.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=3587

Do you think this alteration is small enough that the seat will not have to be adjusted?

I'll try pinning some width out and see what happens.

jruley

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Re: Men's Trouser Fit Check
« Reply #193 on: February 05, 2017, 05:13:11 AM »
Here a total of 2" (5 cm) has been pinned out of the right leg at the knee.  The left leg is unchanged:









peterle

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Re: Men's Trouser Fit Check
« Reply #194 on: February 06, 2017, 12:11:04 AM »
And how do you like it?

An advice: instead of pinning you also could machine baste the seams with a long stitch and looser top thread tension. easy to remove  but less puckering.