Apprentices > Useful Tools For People Learning To Make Quality Garments

Vintage Singer Machines

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TTailor:
I think that the old Singer metal bodied machine of the 1940's through to the 1960's are excellent value. Simple to use and sturdy, they sew through almost anything. Easy to maintain as well.

A step up from that, older industrial straight stitch machines are great value if you have the space for them.

Henry Hall:
I completely second this. Even though I have a Juki industrial, I still use a 1950 Pfaff 130 (not Singer of course, but equivalent) for up to 75% of stitching operations. I also have a Pfaff 30 set up for straight stitching. The stitch quality is very good.


This is it:


The ease of maintenance you mention is an attractive factor. Regular common sense stuff like cleaning out lint from the bobbin and shuttle race and under the feed dogs; a drop of oil in the shuttle race after extended use, and the like.

I'd hope that anyone finding this forum who hasn't yet bought a sewing machine would be guided to a vintage model rather than a new computerised model. The principle of fewer moving parts and less to go wrong is worth following...and they were built like tanks.

Tailleuse:

--- Quote from: TTailor on March 08, 2016, 12:16:06 PM ---I think that the old Singer metal bodied machine of the 1940's through to the 1960's are excellent value. Simple to use and sturdy, they sew through almost anything. Easy to maintain as well.


--- End quote ---

I certainly wouldn't turn one down.

Henry Hall:

--- Quote from: Tailleuse on March 09, 2016, 04:36:41 PM ---I certainly wouldn't turn one down.

--- End quote ---


Tailleuse, if I may ask... if you don't have an industrial (or maybe you do and I'm not paying attention :) ) and you don't have an old cast iron job, what are using for machine work?

hutch--:
i have a taste for Swiss engineering, my first domestic machine was a Bernina 707 and it was a delightful fine little machine. I still own it and its in very good condition. I went for the Elnas that I use because of their excellent engineering, high stitch quality and an unusual capacity, a massive range of stitch types using cams. I did a dirty deal with an old vendor where I swapped him an old black Singer and another Iron monster for every Elna cam he had which made both of us happy.

The model Elna machines I use are 62c which were made about 1970 and back then cost a fortune. I bought mine from eBay from ladies in the country who had carefully looked after them and they are like new. They like to be oiled regularly and the innards are like a Swiss watch but very well made.

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