Author Topic: Sleeve Linings  (Read 995 times)

spookietoo

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Sleeve Linings
« on: October 29, 2018, 03:35:11 AM »
I realize this might be a question for another thread, but as the forum has been a bit quiet lately, I think anyone else wanting to find this answer would locate it easier in this section.

What is the deal with sleeve linings?  Why are they offered as separate materials from the Bemberg and such that are usually utilized for the main body linings?  Are they heavier? Are they lighter? What gives? And why the stripes?

I realize the answer may be buried on C&T - but there are only so many hours in the day.

I just ordered an actual paper catalog from WAWAK , and I am amazed at ther offerings that never seem to appear on their website via mobile phone or laptop.

 The printed page is Soooooo much simpler to navigate for such things.

Greger

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Re: Sleeve Linings
« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2018, 03:10:31 PM »
And different woven method, which is stronger.

peterle

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Re: Sleeve Linings
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2018, 07:24:08 PM »
A sleeve lining fabric is usually in a taffetta weave and heavier than the body lining. So it is much stiffer and gives the whole sleeve more volume and cares for a nice hang of the sleeve. I´m not sure about the stripes, maybe a kind of trademark of the mill? Sleeve linings often come(came?) in a narrower width to avoid excessive waste.

spookietoo

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Re: Sleeve Linings
« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2018, 09:10:22 AM »
Thankyou guys!

I've just lucked into various types of linings at a thrift store. This helps.

Thanks again!

Henry Hall

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Re: Sleeve Linings
« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2018, 09:02:24 AM »
I don't know about the sleeve linings being heavier, maybe they were traditionally, but they seem to be lighter than the main body lining these days.

I got a huge roll of (mainly) green striped lining which I thought I might use for sleeves. It feels too heavy; the only thing it worked in is a tweed jacket. I used it to make an (experimental) lounging robe and it worked out great! The back of the cloth is rough, brushed and stays nicely in place rather than sliding about as robes made out of satin-type material often do.
‘Being perfectly well-dressed gives one a tranquillity that no religion can bestow.’ - Ralph Waldo Emerson.

peterle

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Re: Sleeve Linings
« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2018, 09:22:46 PM »
Henry, maybe your roll of "lining" is a roll of Barchent (as we call it in German)? This cotton fabric is heavier, very shiny on one side and brushed on the back side. It mainly came in fancy printed stripes. It was indeed meant for lounging robes and men´s winter pyjamas. The shiny outside is very useful in bed, because it slides nicely when turning around.

a vintage robe:



Henry Hall

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Re: Sleeve Linings
« Reply #6 on: November 09, 2018, 09:25:30 PM »
Henry, maybe your roll of "lining" is a roll of Barchent (as we call it in German)? This cotton fabric is heavier, very shiny on one side and brushed on the back side. It mainly came in fancy printed stripes. It was indeed meant for lounging robes and men´s winter pyjamas. The shiny outside is very useful in bed, because it slides nicely when turning around.

a vintage robe:




You are right. That is exactly what it is.
‘Being perfectly well-dressed gives one a tranquillity that no religion can bestow.’ - Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Hendrick

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Re: Sleeve Linings
« Reply #7 on: January 28, 2019, 11:11:40 AM »
Hi,
From what I know, for sportscoats and coats, the lining trends to be heavier and in twill weave. The original Bembergs were 3 to 1 twill or heavy buiging Sarins... For lighter coats, suits (summer), linings are usually in A square weave. The lening of the body should be easy to slide on and never “stick”. Sleeve linings are almost always square wovens, but with A stoffer hand, like A taffetas, to keep the Sleven as “rounded” as possible. The typical striped Sleven lening is called “mignonette” officially....


Henry Hall

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Re: Sleeve Linings
« Reply #8 on: January 28, 2019, 11:11:12 PM »
I have a fair collection of vintage bespoke garments from a few countries and there appears to have been very little difference between the traditional lining for coat sleeves and that put into the insides of waistcoats. A striped Bemberg. It's also the lining put into the tops of plain-top trousers (or sometimes the Barchetta).

This it up to about the early '60s, then the linings get noticeably thinner; most commonly rayon, though still thicker and glossier than the paper-thin linings that turn up in mass-produced clothing today.
‘Being perfectly well-dressed gives one a tranquillity that no religion can bestow.’ - Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Hendrick

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Re: Sleeve Linings
« Reply #9 on: January 29, 2019, 06:25:37 AM »
And we love thise clothes, dont we...

Actually, the original Bemberg was a trade mark. Bemberg used also a fiber called “cupro”, a viscose that was made from modified cotton, a silk imitation. It has an incredible drape and has a “buttery” handfeel. That is why people loved Bemberg, and the heavy coat weight lining was used for womens blouse and dresses as well. Rayon is a continuous yarn, made from wood pulp by means of extrusion. It is nowhere near as soft as bemberg, the nature of the continuous yarn also makes it accumulate warmth, which is why many modern garments are such horrors to wear...

Henry Hall

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Re: Sleeve Linings
« Reply #10 on: January 29, 2019, 07:20:12 AM »
Rayon is breathable though; more so than cotton. It's used for Hawaiian shirts. When I was a kid we went on a school science trip to ICI to see that extrusion method you mentioned. They were doing viscose and several polyesters. I think I was bored at the time. Shame on me.
‘Being perfectly well-dressed gives one a tranquillity that no religion can bestow.’ - Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Hendrick

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Re: Sleeve Linings
« Reply #11 on: January 29, 2019, 09:09:42 AM »
Yup, cotton absorbs fluids, until saturated. At that point breathability comes to a dead stop and the garment gets sticky...

Hendrick

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Re: Sleeve Linings
« Reply #12 on: January 29, 2019, 10:37:21 AM »
Ps, I like hawaiian shirts, I have a little book on their history. But so do you, probably..  I also like vintage bowling shirts and 40s and 50s Mcgregor gabardine shirts. The french used to call spun viscose shirtings “fibranne” by the way.

Cheers, Hendrick