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91
Sewing machines and equipment / Re: Industrial machines and 'artisan' machines
« Last post by hutch-- on February 12, 2019, 01:49:40 AM »
I found a few tricks in the maintenance from using a mix of Singer sewing machine oil and a teflon additive for the lighter parts and for the bevel gears inside the free arm I use a teflon grease that does not throw off and it makes a noticeable difference in terms of the smoothness and speed. You are probably right about the rubber feet but its closer to the speed when they are maintained properly that helps them walk across the table. I only use it in short bursts when doing long seams so its not a problem.
92
Sewing machines and equipment / Re: Industrial machines and 'artisan' machines
« Last post by peterle on February 11, 2019, 08:07:47 PM »
@ hutch:

I also love my Elnas. I even got some spare parts lately for my supermatic from the 60´s.

They usually don´t walk across the table. This is probably just because the rubber feet of your machine got hard or desintegrated. Just change them, and everything will be ok.
93
Drafting, Fitting and Construction / Re: Drafting trousers.
« Last post by Adriel on February 11, 2019, 03:58:45 PM »
You see you should add to the front.
I give you a pic about enlarging the front 1 cm. You cut at center. You slide each panel o.5 cm to the right and left. You enlarge the front crotch diameter so that you will have 0.5 cm more. Now connect back to the knees. You have to enlarge your waist dart. But seeing your side view I would enlarge the back dart this amount, so the seam would run more straight. This a  very modest alteration - you add 2 cm more in front.

There was no how to, so took a guess. Hopefully right, feels better, more room for dress.







For the zipper there are more than one way to do this. I attach 2 pics from my leaflet which shows how to sew in the zipper. It is not the way the master tailor do it. It is my way and it works for me.

That is a good help, however, guess I am not clear. Ich gemeint Konstruktion, nicht Material. Really late and been ages, so hopefully not too off. This is the fourth trouser ever sewn, only watched one short video, nothing more, nothing less.

I also sewed in the fishform dart so hopefully get a more honest drape.

Danke!  :)
94
Sewing machines and equipment / Re: Industrial machines and 'artisan' machines
« Last post by hutch-- on February 11, 2019, 01:18:22 PM »
When I first started on a domestic rather than using a fried's industrial, I found a mint condition Bernina 707 which was a very nice small machine to use. I made a lot of stuff on it but one day on my way to do some shopping I passed a garage sale from a small business closing down and saw this Elna for $20.00 AU so I bought it. Did it the gross dis-service of actually cleaning and oiling it properly and who ho, it was like a rocket.

Did a bit of hunting around and found the model that takes cams, a circa 1970 Supermatic and went looking for them on Ebay. Found one very good one from country Victoria (in Australia) that still had the original receipts and was like new. The 1970 price on the receipts was into the rediculous range, it was that expensive back them. Cleaned and oiled it and it was absolutely perfect, nothing to fix and it ran like a new one. Hooked another from South Australia and later did a dirty deal with an old dealer, swapped an old black Singer that was a collectors item for well over 100 cams for the Elna and apart from ducks and flowers, there were many useful stitches in the collection.

With both of the Elnas, if you put the boot into them they start to walk across the table but the speed is great if you are doing multi-step zip zags on high stretch fabrics.

My favourite industrial is an old fully manual Consew that a friend of mine owns. Wide bed, mechanical clutch and a dedicated straight sewer and fast enough to sew ship sails with but she has used it for years making often very fine garments so it seems to come with practice.
95
Drafting, Fitting and Construction / Re: Drafting trousers.
« Last post by posaune on February 10, 2019, 10:03:34 PM »
You see you should add to the front.
I give you a pic about enlarging the front 1 cm. You cut at center. You slide each panel o.5 cm to the right and left. You enlarge the front crotch diameter so that you will have 0.5 cm more. Now connect back to the knees. You have to enlarge your waist dart. But seeing your side view I would enlarge the back dart this amount, so the seam would run more straight. This a  very modest alteration - you add 2 cm more in front.

For the zipper there are more than one way to do this. I attach 2 pics from my leaflet which shows how to sew in the zipper. It is not the way the master tailor do it. It is my way and it works for me.
good luck
lg
posaune






96
Drafting, Fitting and Construction / Re: Women's trouser drafts
« Last post by posaune on February 10, 2019, 09:14:10 PM »
My only english draft (I have no american) is maybe from the 60 th. It is from Ann Hagar. I have drawn a  Müller pants (same measurements) over it.
You see that are 4 cm more ease in the english at hip level and 2 cm at crotch diameter. The crotch length is the same.
Interesting is the front pattern in the second draft the outseam has a different angle and so more length as the back outseam.
lg
posaune

97
Drafting, Fitting and Construction / Re: Women's trouser drafts
« Last post by Henry Hall on February 10, 2019, 12:09:46 PM »
I'd like to know why American drafts are always drawn with a closed leg? You see it on all the older ones. Don't know about the new.
98
Drafting, Fitting and Construction / Re: Women's trouser drafts
« Last post by Hendrick on February 10, 2019, 09:35:25 AM »
Hi,
In any method I have seen, the ouseam is +1 cm for the back leg, - 1cm for the front. As for the second pattern, to my first impression it would lack a serious amount of seatlength...
99
Drafting, Fitting and Construction / Re: Knee width affecting crotch width
« Last post by Hendrick on February 10, 2019, 09:11:51 AM »
Hi,
Women’s trousers are infinetely more complicated than men’s. When developing women’s pants, I like to start from the silhouette, drape and mold of the pant, but not after deciding on material. Nearly all nonstretch materials are fairly easy. Secondly, I decide the position of the waist. From there I decide the shape of basin. So, really, the material is everything, especially with strech qualities. Basically, other than having a crotch, in- and outseams, the pattern of a stretch pant has virtually nothing to do with that of a non stretch trouser. Just as a small sidenote; when Ibfirst started fitting women’s jeans in the late seventies every fitting model was able to hold a sheet of paper between her knees when her feet were put together. In contrast, these days, most models have a hard time doing the same with a pingpong ball. Just to illustrate in what ways women’s bodies have changed...

Cheers, Hendrick
100
Drafting, Fitting and Construction / Women's trouser drafts
« Last post by Futura on February 10, 2019, 07:31:14 AM »
We are currently snowed in and our furnace broke. My sewing room is now far too cold to inhabit. As a result, I have excess time on my hands to study odd drafts while sat by one of two electric fan heaters...  ;D

The first image is from "Pants" by Anna Romaniuk and Ellen Knight. The second is from "Professional Pattern Making for Designers of Women's Wear" by Jack Handford. Both books date ftom 1974.

Both drafts create knee and hem widths of equal size on the topsides and undersides! Is there a way to correct this on the patterns without distorting the shape?

The slope of the seat seam on the Handford draft appears to be created by a lengthened dart as part of the overall waist reduction. I have not seen the angle calculated this way before.

Any thoughts would be much appreciated!




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