Bespoke Cutter And Tailor

Bespoke Professionals => Women's Cutter And Tailor => Topic started by: Greger on March 31, 2016, 05:38:43 AM

Title: skirts dresses etc
Post by: Greger on March 31, 2016, 05:38:43 AM
http://uniquedesignerpatterns.blogspot.com/search/label/COOLIE%20jacket (http://uniquedesignerpatterns.blogspot.com/search/label/COOLIE%20jacket)

Looking for some ideas? Some methods of construction I wouldn't use. But, then I invent my own, anyway. Some nice garments.
Title: Re: skirts dresses etc
Post by: Henry Hall on March 31, 2016, 05:50:42 AM
The facings here are nicely done:


(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-meiJ3Ejc6sE/TqM3zGC6IwI/AAAAAAAAErM/tuGDRYBIMF8/s400/12%2Ba%2B.jpg)
Title: Re: skirts dresses etc
Post by: Greger on March 31, 2016, 06:44:16 AM
Look at the other pages. Posted one for starter.
Title: Re: skirts dresses etc
Post by: posaune on March 31, 2016, 07:42:33 AM
This is called "bagging" the lining. I think you will not use it in couture or custom tailoring. Because you have to cut away fabric and this will not enable you to alter the garment afterwards once finished.
In custom tailoring I always think of altering (gaining or loosing weight) - but maybe I'm an old lame duck.
lg
posaune
Title: Re: skirts dresses etc
Post by: hutch-- on March 31, 2016, 07:58:25 AM
I think the distinction between disposable and repairable clothing is a valid one. A properly made garment that has seam allowances for alterations is a harder garment to make but it means for a person who invested more money in quality clothing, they extend the life of the garment if it can be altered to fit any size changes they require over time. In terms of economy it makes sense to have your share of better quality garments that last a number of seasons rather than annually disposable clothing. Here you just need to add up the costs over time, a well made garment at twice the price is cheaper in the long run than a disposable garment that may not even last half as long.
Title: Re: skirts dresses etc
Post by: Greger on March 31, 2016, 08:28:40 AM
Depends on what cloth. Cotton doesn't hold the dye very well. One pair of pants I let out the seat seam. They were only good for gardening after that with nobody around. At least nobody stood behind me to notice the dark strick up the seat seam.

Really, there are wealthy people who will buy a garment, or suit, for one time use. There is no reason to make these garments for everlasting. It always pays to ask what the garment is for. Rare, but it does happen. For women, one garment for sure, the mighty Wedding Dress. But even men sometime buy a one time use now and then. Really wealthy people, whatever you charge them, is peanuts. A guy here in this "town" bought every quarter a new wardrobe. Four times a year he emptied his closest. He was buying six to eight suits each time. Something like 28 suits a year (not to mention other clothes).
Title: Re: skirts dresses etc
Post by: Henry Hall on March 31, 2016, 09:01:58 AM
This is called "bagging" the lining. I think you will not use it in couture or custom tailoring. Because you have to cut away fabric and this will not enable you to alter the garment afterwards once finished.
In custom tailoring I always think of altering (gaining or loosing weight) - but maybe I'm an old lame duck.
lg
posaune

Yes it's bagging, but that doesn't change the fact that it's a nicely finished garment. This woman is making in a different way; not lesser or wrong, only different. I don't think every person pursuing clothing construction ought only to be following pure bespoke techniques.
Title: Re: skirts dresses etc
Post by: Schneiderfrei on March 31, 2016, 10:57:26 AM
That's a great reason for avoiding bagging posaune - Not being able to adjust the garment.  I suppose it's very difficult to go in after and undo all the hidden seams, and to arrange inlay in the interior of the 'bag' while sewing up.
Title: Re: skirts dresses etc
Post by: spookietoo on August 04, 2017, 03:09:35 PM
I've just lost a bit of weight and an old RTW jacket - that I was never happy with -  I think will now suffice with a bit of alteration. It of course has a bagged lining which was a breeze to remove and taking up the hip area and eeking out a bit of extra bust ease is simple to get to.

The sleeves of a bagged lining is what is most noticeable to me as I wear one. I like for the sleeve lining to be hand stitched in separately, the lining simply isn't as noticeable - if that makes sense.

Lining was dreadful awful cheap bad polyester - like wearing a sandwich bag - so that's being replaced - but the old stuff will make the cutting of a new lining easy - I never wore it enough to mis-shape anything so its a perfect pattern. 
Title: Re: skirts dresses etc
Post by: Tailleuse on September 01, 2017, 09:21:22 AM
This is called "bagging" the lining. I think you will not use it in couture or custom tailoring. Because you have to cut away fabric and this will not enable you to alter the garment afterwards once finished.
In custom tailoring I always think of altering (gaining or loosing weight) - but maybe I'm an old lame duck.
lg
posaune

Yes it's bagging, but that doesn't change the fact that it's a nicely finished garment. This woman is making in a different way; not lesser or wrong, only different. I don't think every person pursuing clothing construction ought only to be following pure bespoke techniques.

Paco Peralta (see the name in the corner of the photo) is a man.
Title: Re: skirts dresses etc
Post by: hutch-- on September 01, 2017, 12:38:10 PM
I wonder if anyone has ever used a fine zipper to solve the problem of altering a lined jacket ? I have seen very fine and very long zippers that would do this task well.
Title: Re: skirts dresses etc
Post by: posaune on September 02, 2017, 07:59:24 PM
Please, I do not understand this, hutch. Coul you explain it better.
lg
posaune
Title: Re: skirts dresses etc
Post by: hutch-- on September 03, 2017, 12:47:20 AM
Sorry if it did not make sense. I have seen long fine zippers available and usually reasonably cheap. If you made a lined coat but wanted to be able to alter it later if the person changed size, pulling apart a conventional lining is a lot of work. All my suggestion was is that it should not be hard to put a fine zipper in the lining, probably vertically down the middle so that the inside of the coat would be accessible simply by unzipping the zipper. if it was a long fine zipper it would not be noticed by the wearer but would be accessible to the tailor.
Title: Re: skirts dresses etc
Post by: Greger on September 03, 2017, 01:50:35 AM
The problem is the word cheap. But, I think I see what you are saying. A zipper by each side seam to have easy access to the sideseams for adjustments.
Title: Re: skirts dresses etc
Post by: Schneiderfrei on September 03, 2017, 08:18:53 AM
And Hutch, Does it presuppose a certain lack of confidence ;p
Title: Re: skirts dresses etc
Post by: hutch-- on September 09, 2017, 11:54:36 AM
The notion of "cheap" here was "Low Cost" and zippers can be bought generally for peanuts if you go to the right place. Most of the ones I have seen are nylon or similar and since one or two in a lining are not subject to any real loading, they don't have to be heavy weights like a jacket front zipper.

"lack of confidence" ? Probably but if I was faced with the task of manually unpicking a hand sewn lining or undoing a zipper or two, the choice would be an easy one.
Title: Re: skirts dresses etc
Post by: Greger on September 09, 2017, 05:17:56 PM
Having the lining attached to the coat at the sideseams makes it less sloppy. If letting out the sideseams that would include the linings, too. Not sure what the zipper will do since the seams are being opened anyway.