Recent Posts

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91
I wish I had a better understanding of German.
I can follow along because I know how to put in pockets and flys,  but I wish I could easily understand more of the speaking in videos and more of the writing in the books I have.
Nicely done videos.

I really was thinking about doing this video in English and Spanish, too! Maybe I can add some subtitels, but my German and Spanish is excellent but in English I would need somebody to put it in correct phrases :D
92
So! You found this place.
It must be pretty nice to find a couple of your videos being recommended here.
Glad you came by. Hopefully you can participate now and then, when not to busy elsewhere.
Wish more tailors wrote here.

Yes, I was very proud to see my videos been recommend here! Normally, they where made for hobby sewers... in jackets for example we do the welt pockets nearly just by hand so a quite different way. But this is what I love about our profession! There are so many ways and I think these videos can help beginners in tailoring, too! As we see so little about men tailoring....

I am here from the first moment! But to be honest, we all have this busy days and I forget about the forum here :-(

Warm greetings from Cologne :-)

Sebastian
93
I wish I had a better understanding of German.
I can follow along because I know how to put in pockets and flys,  but I wish I could easily understand more of the speaking in videos and more of the writing in the books I have.
Nicely done videos.
94
Reference Videos For Apprentices / Re: Men's Trousers Slanted Side Pocket and Zipper Fly
« Last post by Greger on February 27, 2018, 07:10:23 PM »
So! You found this place.
It must be pretty nice to find a couple of your videos being recommended here.
Glad you came by. Hopefully you can participate now and then, when not to busy elsewhere.
Wish more tailors wrote here.
95
Good post. I like watching his videos.

I don't have room for more than one table so I use a hardened-glass sheet on the table after seeing it in one of his other videos. At the beginning I had to keep reminding myself not to use the iron like I did when I was only working on the wood! I don't know if it's heat-proof, but I don't want to find out either.

Like you I also round the front (and also the back) corner of the pocket, though I cut everything square beforehand. On the last pair I employed jetted front pockets and tried out shaped front pockets like those in the ABC des Schneiderhandwerks.

Well, for ironing on this table, I use a very thick blanket... the glas is very nice to work on :)
96
Patternmaking Reference / Re: Unicut Shirt - Swiss 1974 - Translated to English
« Last post by Schneiderfrei on February 21, 2018, 12:29:44 PM »
Fig. 1: Schnittkonstruktion der Weste für Normalfigur
Die Masse für Gr. 50:

Oberweite        50
Taillenweite      45      (Ow — 5 cm)
Rückenhöhe     23 ½    (¼ Ow + ¼ Tl)
Taillenläng       44 ½   (¼ Körpergrösse)
Rückenbreite    20 ½   (¼ Ow + 8 cm)
Brustbreite       20       (½ Ow — 5cm)
Halsbreite          7 ¾     (⅛ Ow + 1 ½ cm)

Mit Ausnahme der Oberweite und Taillenweite werden alle
Körpermasse ohne Schnittzugabe eingemessen.
97
Patternmaking Reference / Re: Unicut – September 71 pg 67 Men's Shirt in English
« Last post by TTailor on February 20, 2018, 10:43:51 PM »
Thanks for the translation!
98
Patternmaking Reference / Re: Unicut – September 71 pg 67 Men's Shirt in English
« Last post by Greger on February 20, 2018, 04:33:47 PM »
Wow! You translated it. That is really nice.
99
Patternmaking Reference / Unicut – September 71 pg 67 Men's Shirt in English
« Last post by Schneiderfrei on February 20, 2018, 10:06:58 AM »
Unicut – September 71 pg 67


The Men’s Shirt

Without Seam Allowances

Fig. 67: The Basic Draft for the Classic Shape


Through appropriate seam placement, a fashionable ‘waisted’ form, without back pleats, can also be derived from this draft.
Since the shirt is secured by the trouser waistband, even in sitting, it must be given extra length in the back, at the Rh back height and Tl waist length.  This is true, at least partially, even for a woman’s blouse.

The Measurements:

Ow    Chest width – 51 cm
Collar width   39 cm
Outer sleeve length – 62 cm (from the armhole seam ‘til the wrist)

A. . . .      A1 = 1/6 Collar width + 0.5 cm : 7 cm
A. . . .      W = 1/3 from A … A1
W. . . .      O = back height + 3 cm: 26 cm
W. . . .       T = waist length + 3 cm: 48 cm
O. . . .        O1 = Rückenbreite + 1 cm: 21.5 cm
A1. . . .     A2 = 1 cm
A3 ....       S = 1/5 from A3 ... O1 - 1 cm
S ....         S1 = 2 cm
R       = in the lower quarter, from O1 . . . S1, 1 cm extension from the diagonal line.
O1 ...       O2 = ¼ Chest circumference + 1.5 cm
O2 ...       A4 = O1 ... A3 - 3 cm
O2 ...       O3 = chest width + 1 cm
A …       A7 = A . . . A1
A6 …     C = A . . . A7 + 1 cm
O2 ...      V = 4 cm
O2 …     S2 = O1 ... S1 - 2 cm
A7 …     S2 = A2 . . . S1

(Calculations for the body measurements: Rb Back height, Tl Waist length, Rb Back width and Bb Chest width are found in: INTERMODE Nr. 7):

The Normal Calculations of the Body Measurements:

Damen                             Herren                  Kinder
Tl    ¼ Kg – 1                  ¼ Kg                     ¼ Kg – 1
Rh   ¼ Tl + ¼ Ow – 1      ¼ Tl + ¼ Ow          ½ Tl + 0,5
Rb   ¼ Ow + 6,5              ¼ Ow + 8             ¼ Ow + 5
Bb   ½ Ow – 3                 ½ Ow – 5              ½ Ow – 2

The Length from W is about 80 cm.
O4 = middle of O1 . . . O2.  At the waist, remove 2 cm from each side, tapering down to the Length.
Centre Front overlap: 1.75 cm
Separate off (cut off) the shoulder yoke pieces, 3 cm down from each of A7, S2 and S1, 4 cm from W.
Position of the shoulder blade pleat (1 cm: Amount from A1 . . . A2): 1/3 from A2 . . . S1.  A 4 cm fold is placed at the same point, below the yoke, and this amount is added to the Centre Back (parallel to the length).

Fig. 68: Yoke and Collar


The yoke (upper left) is made by closing the shoulder blade seams and joining up the separated front and back shoulder parts.  Center Back is on the fold, all seams require allowances.

The classic one piece collar (upper right):
a . . . .b = ½ collar width (19,5 cm)
c . . . .b = 5 cm
c . . . d = Front overlap (1.75 cm)
d . . . e = 0.5 cm
a . . . m =1.5 cm
m . . . h =3.5 cm
c . . . f = 3 cm
f . . . .g = 1 cm
f . . . k = 8 cm
k . . . l = 4 cm
h . . . .i = 3.8 cm (with the one piece collar this width may only be a few millimetres more than the collar foot (band) m . . .h).

Fig. 69: The Sleeve


Draw a vertical middle line:
s ... p = Outer arm length minus 7 cm (Cuff width)
s ... o = ½ cap height (cap height = O1 . . . S minus 1/5 of this amount)
s ... o1 = S1 . . . O4 (Fig. 67)
s ... o2 = S2 . . . O4 (Fig. 67)
Between o1 und s: In the first third, hollow by 3/4 cm, in the second third curve out by 1 cm. At the middle of s . . . o2: curve out by 1 3/4 cm.
p . . . p1 = 15 cm
p . . . p2= 15 cm
p2... r = 6 cm
r ... s = 11 cm (cut for slit)
p3. . . p4 = ca. 13 cm (7 cm wide single or double cuff).

Fig. 70: Draft for Waisted Men’s Shirt


Compared with Fig. 67 the following points are changed:
A ... A1 = 2 cm. This amount instead of the back pleat is set as the dart in the waist seam.
W. . . A5 = W . . . O2 + 1/20 Ow (d.h. A5 is about 1/20 of the chest circumference in front of a circular arc drawn with its centre at W from O2. This shoulder position is also employed for other kinds of garments.  The amount A7 . . . A5 taken from the waist seam as chest dart.  Waist suppression in the front 1 cm in the back 3 cm.

For the time being, this concludes the “UNICUT” course.  At the most, it could be supplemented by the technical article on “Der Pelzmantel für Damen und Herren” [The Fur Coat for Women and Men] in Nr. 12/1970, never the less, it does not claim to be complete.  The author simply wanted to prove by simple examples that all clothing, be it from men’s shirts to ladies fur coats, can be derived in a simple, logical and safe manner from the same basic plan, thus avoiding time wasting during vocational learning.  This is especially important, since the boundaries between men’s and women’s fashions are gradually disappearing (and this is not only in the field of sport and leisure wear).  For borderline cases in body shape or fashion line the seamless transition from women’s to men’s clothing is missing.  With UNICUT this gap is closed.
100
Patternmaking Reference / Re: Shirt Draft UNICUT Swiss 1971 - Sept pg 64
« Last post by Schneiderfrei on February 19, 2018, 12:16:25 AM »
Any corrections welcomed via PM.

G
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