Author Topic: Shirts - Armpit gussets  (Read 2961 times)

jruley

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Shirts - Armpit gussets
« on: August 04, 2016, 11:24:51 AM »
Some of the 19th century shirt drafts I've worked with include an underarm gusset for freedom of movement.  At least one modern menswear supplier offers an updated version:

http://www.duluthtrading.com/store/mens/mens-shirts/52007.aspx?processor=content

With fall "just around the corner", I'm thinking about incorporating such a thing in a work shirt.  Does anyone have any tips on drafting one?  This might be similar to what is used by professional dancers and orchestra conductors.

Thanks,

Jim R.

TTailor

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Re: Shirts - Armpit gussets
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2016, 09:03:05 PM »
I wish they had tried to match the plaids a little bit in their sewn in gusset.

Sewn in gussets do create extra thickness at the intersection of the seams and the armhole.

In a one piece sleeve like that a grown on gusset would be what I would choose to do. This would have a seam at the underarm right up through the gusset, allowing the sleeve to be sewn in flat, and the pattern of the fabric to continue undisturbed.

A one piece sewn in gusset would require setting the sleeve in like you would a jacket. I cannot tell what they have done at the underarm. A separate gusset probably can be fit into the lay out on the fabric with less fabric wastage than a sleeve with a grown on gusset in a manufacturing setting.

jruley

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Re: Shirts - Armpit gussets
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2016, 10:22:18 PM »

In a one piece sleeve like that a grown on gusset would be what I would choose to do. This would have a seam at the underarm right up through the gusset, allowing the sleeve to be sewn in flat, and the pattern of the fabric to continue undisturbed.


So, essentially you draft the sleeve head as normal.  Then you extend the length of the seam at the top the desired amount (say an inch), and smooth in the curves to meet the existing profile a couple of inches away from the seam?


posaune

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Re: Shirts - Armpit gussets
« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2016, 04:09:15 AM »
I think it is like in this draft

lg posaune

TTailor

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Re: Shirts - Armpit gussets
« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2016, 08:13:13 AM »
Like Posaune's post.
The trick is choosing the point at which you want to start and end the gusset, the goal is towards the natural pivot point of the arm to the body. Then you choose the height of the gusset.
The gusset seam line must measure the same as the sleeve did pre gusset, hence the sleeve seam flares out in the gusset area.
You also need a smooth transition from original sleeve line into the gusset.

jruley

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Re: Shirts - Armpit gussets
« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2016, 09:37:54 AM »
Thank you both very much!

Schneiderfrei

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Re: Shirts - Armpit gussets
« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2016, 10:07:48 AM »
That grown on gusset seems to effectively shorten the cap height.

jruley

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Re: Shirts - Armpit gussets
« Reply #7 on: August 05, 2016, 11:49:28 AM »
That grown on gusset seems to effectively shorten the cap height.

I think so, too.  The difference will be in the profile.  If you used a "by the book" draft for a lower cap height the curve would be very flat.  Developing it this way it will be more S-shaped.

To Terri's point, if you flatten the curve too much you will mess up the natural pivot point of the sleeve.  Binding and pulls in the top of the cap will result.

TTailor

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Re: Shirts - Armpit gussets
« Reply #8 on: August 05, 2016, 09:14:31 PM »
the gusset does not flatten the cap height overall, but you must have a defined area of transition from original sleeve line into the gusset.
If you just made a flatter sleeve, you would also be making the sleeve wider. In this method, the sleeve width remains relatively unchanged.

posaune

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Re: Shirts - Armpit gussets
« Reply #9 on: August 05, 2016, 09:54:08 PM »
You must imagine this "rounded" pieces of fabric from side seam up will work like a gusset. It folds together under the armpit  when the arm is hanging down. If the arm is going up it relieves the added length. The armpit will not look so clean as it would with a classical cut. But it is meant for people who move and want an elegant sleeve width.
Here in Germany we have it in coats  with some "Tracht" pattern ( Costume suiting??).  Originated maybe back from Baroque (1700).
It is easier to sew then a gusset and maybe more durable.
lg
posaune

jruley

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Re: Shirts - Armpit gussets
« Reply #10 on: August 11, 2016, 11:32:18 AM »
I gave both methods a try with the mockup.   The right sleeve is a new one with the grown-on gusset, giving an inch more seam length.  The left is the same basic sleeve draft (low crown), but with a sewn-in gusset giving 2 inches more.

Both provide additional freedom of movement without seeming to disturb the fit too much.  I may try a larger sewn-in one just for comparison's sake.