Author Topic: Cutting fabric with one way design  (Read 1341 times)

TTailor

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Cutting fabric with one way design
« on: May 03, 2017, 09:03:35 PM »
I have a question for you.
Sometimes, I will be given fabric that has a one way design, like an overall floral or sometimes a one directional or asymmetrical stripe.
To clarify, I mean that the prints or the stripes  are not symmetrical, cannot be "book matched" at the centre front or centre back.
What I do with the floral style  is to lay the jacket pattern on the fabric and match the centre fronts so the overall pattern contines uninterrupted across the fronts.

Do you do the same with an asymmetrical stripe, (red, black, white stripe,  red, black white stripe...) or do you or would you slice the fabric (150cm wide) along the fold and rotate the one layer so you now have the stripes "matched" .

Do you understand what I mean?
Would like to hear your thoughts. Most menswear stripes I get are symmetrical but I have received two different pieces this year that are not.

Schneiderfrei

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Re: Cutting fabric with one way design
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2017, 09:28:38 PM »
Hi Terri,

Would it depend on the intent of the pattern?

The pattern might be intended to convey a symbol or a pattern that was desired to be displayed.  If not it would then depend on whether the asymmetrical pattern would overwhelm the wearer. 

If it was a big floral the optical effect might be camouflage? If not the above, it might be that you could break it up, you could choose parts of the pattern that created an artistic effect, like painting with the elements of the pattrern?

TTailor

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Re: Cutting fabric with one way design
« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2017, 12:18:17 AM »
I dont think so.
In a floral, i try to keep the overall pattern of the fabric continuous when the garment is buttoned up.

If I get a moment today I will photograph an example of what I am talking about.

posaune

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Re: Cutting fabric with one way design
« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2017, 02:37:53 AM »
In my opinion it shows more harmony when you cut the first front and lay this so on the fabric that the second front matches the patterns. This way the sleeves would be equal.
lg
posaune

Greger

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Re: Cutting fabric with one way design
« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2017, 03:56:25 AM »
Are they buying you curtain fabric?

A perfect match that blends into the other.
Or,
The exact opposite. So, high contrast, or clash.

What is the characters role? And, does the actor's true character fit into that?  Does he have snappy eyes and movements? A clean cut mis-match fits some people. A perfect blend and the person inside the garment is forgotten, unles, outlined. Clothes are about image. What image is the actor to put on? Zany, crazy, put together, average dressing ability...?

jruley

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Re: Cutting fabric with one way design
« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2017, 09:56:44 AM »

The pattern might be intended to convey a symbol or a pattern that was desired to be displayed. 

I'd check this with the director or whomever is responsible.  I know some (maybe all) tartan fabric has an up/down, left/right.  It may not be obvious, but it's significant to the wearer.

TTailor

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Re: Cutting fabric with one way design
« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2017, 07:54:26 AM »
Hello again,
i am not stymied by the project and asking the designers is often fruitless because I have much more knowledge than most of them in this regard.

Here is a period 18thc style velvet waistcoat cut so the centre fronts are continuous with teh design printed on the velvet.

Anyway, to illustrate my question I will show you a couple of pictures of the wool I was given. I did a little internet searching and what I seem to have found is traditional boating jackets sometimes school jackets which show the garment with stripes being cut all one way as in the first photo.
this is how the stripes would show at CF go if I cut it as the fabric is woven


this is what it could look like at CF if I cut the fabric along the fold, and turned the top layer


keep in mind that this is a two piece suit in this fabric not just a jacket.
which one is better in your view or does it matter at all?

Greger

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Re: Cutting fabric with one way design
« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2017, 08:05:19 AM »
I like both ways equal. But purposes can select one and not the other. If purpose is not on the menu, then flip a coin.

Is the bottom one mostly seen in bath robes and etc. and the top one in outer wear?

Schneiderfrei

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Re: Cutting fabric with one way design
« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2017, 10:17:24 AM »
I bet it depends on the 'station' in life that the person occupied. But also they were probably a lot less fussy than we imagine.

For an amusement I have been making and selling a few black velvet brimmed hats, like the one in the Richard the third portrait.  I imagined that they were stiff and of a constant shape, but if you look at all the Plantagenet kings and Henry seventh they were all of a very different shape and degree of floppiness.  they probably didn't care, it just had to be velvet and silk and black.  Some even show the brim down.

It would take extra thought and work to match the patterns.

G

TTailor

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Re: Cutting fabric with one way design
« Reply #9 on: May 15, 2017, 11:03:02 AM »
Quote
Is the bottom one mostly seen in bath robes and etc. and the top one in outer wear?

Not sure.
more often than not, the suiting I receive is symmetrical and balanced and would produce a suit looking like the second photo, but in the end I cut it as in the first photo and all the white stripes are to the right of the black stripe as it travels around teh body.

jruley

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Re: Cutting fabric with one way design
« Reply #10 on: May 15, 2017, 01:23:52 PM »
I did a little internet searching and what I seem to have found is traditional boating jackets sometimes school jackets which show the garment with stripes being cut all one way as in the first photo.

If this is what your sources show, I'd cut it this way.

FWIW I think it looks better too :)

Schneiderfrei

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Re: Cutting fabric with one way design
« Reply #11 on: May 15, 2017, 03:15:51 PM »
I agree Terri and jruley, especially if there is a nap to the cloth. the shine might be different.

peterle

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Re: Cutting fabric with one way design
« Reply #12 on: May 15, 2017, 07:35:38 PM »
I also would have cut it like you did for everyday wear, and for historic accuracy. Iīve also seen bold striped university blazer worked this way.

But for a costume tailor eventually the character could give some hints?: For me the first version shows openess; the pattern is naturally flowing over the body and the eyes will follow. this signifies a certain non chalance, lightheartedness, an effortless elegance for me. The symmetric version pulls the eyes to the center line, no escape. I would choose this version for a much more controlled maybe even pedantric character. For a sloppy or irresponsible character I probably would choose a bad pattern matching, everything slightly off and shifted to pronounce the disorderliness.

BTW what line of the pattern did You use as center line? Some blazers of the 30īs dontīuse the middle of a stripe but itīs edge as CF. (University boxing Blazer in "vintage menswear" by Sims Luckett &Gunn)