Author Topic: drafting a sleeve  (Read 439 times)

posaune

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drafting a sleeve
« on: August 20, 2017, 07:19:40 PM »
How to Draft a Sleeve for an Armhole with the Deepest Part at 1/3 of Armholediameter

Before I start, have in mind a sleeve (cap) is always a compromise between looking good and comfortable.
The armhole should be large enough – but not too large and have a fine closed fit around the body  – no gaping
First of all I show you different armholes:



These are for the same person and all garments are fitting

So every time first the armhole then the sleeve. I have choosen an armhole from my work. (It is not a lovely size 38!)
You lay your pattern front to back this way:



Beware NO SEW ALLLOWANCE and deepest point is here side seam.

You measure:
the front circ, the back circ and the armhole height just in the center of the connecting line right down to the deepest point of armsyce. (You measure the curves with the standing up measure tape - not flat on the table).

And you measure the distance from sideseam to the notches . Fill it in the table (The colored numbers are  the variables).



For cap height I choose 83% of Armhole height (You can choose between 75% - 85% for fitted gaments).
Or rule of thumb: 1/3 of the armhole circ for this kind of garment.
This cap height allows a rel. small ease and gives a reasonable width and a bit of rope.
From the front and back circ you take 95%. You choose the ease. It depends on the fabric 3 cm is good here (it is only 5 % of armhole circ - I have a sturdy demin for the jacket).  For a nice wool you can choose 10-12 %  or more. You part the ease  25% goes into front and 75 % in the back. You do your math. The biceps is measured and you add the ease you need. Ladies in the bigger sizes and developed overarms need more ease- maybe 5 cm for a jacket or coat. You must try it out.
End part 1

Schneiderfrei

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Re: drafting a sleeve
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2017, 09:49:12 PM »
Thank you so much posaune.  What a great bit of writing to think about.

posaune

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Re: drafting a sleeve
« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2017, 06:33:00 PM »
part 2
Drafting the Scaffold

Do a horizontal line longer than biceps + ease and around center draft a line up with the cap height.
Do a circ with your calculated front length (red; B) from A and a circ with your calculated back circ (green; C).




Please measure from B to C. This must have your biceps + ease. This draft has about 43,77 cm – okay.  Now do the horizontal line touching Point A with the 1/3 of the distance B to C (43.77/3 = 14,6). We part it that 2/5 is in front then Point A and 3 /5 in back because or Armhole is so splitted.
(If you do not have that width - you must change a parameter, must go down with the cap height or accept more ease - or alter the armhole a bit. But I speak later about this.)

Now you add the sleeve length from point A down and you do an rectangle. We need more landmarks to be able to draft the cap. We mark in front (B-A) and back (C-A)  2/5 of its length. Now you draft 2 lines (green) going through each 2/5 points down.


The last pic let you draw right angles up till they meet the corners. You part the right angles at the top in halfes.


And you mark 1/3 in the lower red part. At the 1/3 marking you add a little circ with 0.8 cm + 10% Ease (+ 0.3 ) and at back with 0.7 cm + 10% Ease ( + 0.3). This will help you with the curve's form .

end part 2










TTailor

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Re: drafting a sleeve
« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2017, 10:06:45 PM »
I like this, it is something I am going to try out using  one of my existing patterns and compare the shape to the standard process I use.
I think I will also cut a toile to see how it looks.
Very interesting.

Is this your standard way of sleeve drafting or just one you use because it offers something different than another draft method?

posaune

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Re: drafting a sleeve
« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2017, 12:50:51 AM »
Hi Terri, yes it is a nice  (and easy) draft and very versatile. In changing some variables you can get sleeves for all kind of armholes. The process stays the same. And you see right at the beginning will the sleeve fit the biceps width. I came across searching for a good sleeve for T-shirts. (I do not believe in the same curve for front and back cap).  I then found from the same author Guido Hofenbitzer in another book this method extended to other sleeve types. I simplified it a bit. And from then on I use this sleeve.
Part 3

Now start to draw the sleeve cap curve. There  is no iron cast law, just try to be near the marks. The result should look like a nice curve with no corners and bubbles.




To achieve this you draft the cap like this (but if you look close at the pic the part where it should be straight is too round. Especially the back. It must be cleaned up).
 (B) curved – straight - curved  - nearly straight at top a bit (A) – curved – straight - curved (C) .

Measure the curve. The whole „circ“ measures 61.6 (the armhole had 58.8) so the ease is 3.2 cm. If you want, I can show later how to part with not wanted ease if your ease is too much.
Now set in the notches and finish the sleeve.

The Notches

You lay the sleeve pattern to the bodice pattern like shown. There is no ease at Point B till to the notch. You can copy the curve from the front armhole.



In the back there is already ease in the lower part of the crown so you draft the notch in the sleeve 1/5 of the ease higher (here 0.5cm). The curve will NOT resemble the back curve of the bodice like the front.

Here zoomed in


When you draft a sleeve for a man you can keep this curve more shallower because of the muscles there.

End part 3




Gramountoto

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Re: drafting a sleeve
« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2017, 05:26:43 PM »
Thank you Posaune for sharing this! I Will definitively try it.
 Do you take into account the upper front armhole stretching and the back armhole shrinking in the drafting?

posaune

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Re: drafting a sleeve
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2017, 08:39:06 PM »
@Terri: Dennic Chunman Lo is another reference for this method. But not so mathematical
@Gramountoto: No, I did not. But I think, it is not necessary because you measure seam line of the fitted armhole. There you would have done the stretching in beck and holding in at back.
Part 4
Distribution of the Ease

At first the armhole must be prepared.


You see I have parted the upper parts of the armhole in half and done markings and measured the distances.
Another table


This is very mathematical.  You can use a rule of thumb as well:

example here 3 cm ease


Mark the sleeve cap:




End part 4

peterle

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Re: drafting a sleeve
« Reply #7 on: August 24, 2017, 04:34:38 AM »
I really like this method, it seems to be very precise. Thank You for sharing it!

Schneiderfrei

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Re: drafting a sleeve
« Reply #8 on: August 24, 2017, 10:59:01 AM »
I love it, thank you posaune.

posaune

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Re: drafting a sleeve
« Reply #9 on: August 24, 2017, 08:44:56 PM »
Part 5
Set in the Sleeve for beginners
I show you here my way. It works for me. There are several others. You must do it how it is easiest for you.
I think this ease is alright for my demin and I can ease this in. I mark the pattern of my armhole with little snips or tailor's tacks. I do the same with the sleeve cap.
Now I start  with pinning. Wrong side up of jacket and I look into armhole and the sleeve. The sleeve is pinned side seam to side seam armhole. Another pin is at SP and shoulderseam. I grab the armhole so that the seam allowances of armhole and sleeve cap run over my curled (?word) fingers. Where the seam will be  is the highest part of my finger tips- the armhole and sleeve seam allowance are "bend" into my palms (see my master pic! hemhem).

The sleeve has now a longer way to run over the fingertips (because it lays above) as the armhole and so the fullness will distribute evenly. (if someone can say this in good english I would appreciate that)



I pin the notches together. No problem. First is the zero ease part. Baste it. Next part: Fn-Sp1 pin and distribute the ease - baste. Next from Sp1-SP ( is the difficultest part) same procedur  but try to have no ease 0.8-0.5 cm before SP. Because the sleeve is on graim here you'll get easy little folds. You can ease best where the sleeve fabric is not on grain. You do the next fraction till you end at sideseam.
The sleeve is in. Try it on and look if the hang is correct.

Why all these Explainations?

This system is very versatile. You can draft every inset sleeve be it a fabric, knit, or shirt. Here you put in other variables. Let's take a men's shirt style. For example I take the same armhole and same measurements to show you how it works. (In reality the shirt armhole is longer and more flat than a armhole for fitted garments. See examples at the beginning.) We alter the cap height to 65% = 15 and the ease of cap is 2%  = 1.2. And we take 96 % for the 2 sides of the triangle. So A-B would be 26,2 cm and B-C 31,4 cm

In the pic you see the shirt sleeve cap and in comparison the sleeve for my jacket



As rule of thumb the cap height for shirts is ¼ of Armholecirc + - some centimeter . Here the cap height is 15 cm – 14.7 would be the  ¼ circ.

When you look at the first pic here you can see why I'm so excited about. I have my armhole and draw the scaffold Basic line, sleeve cap height and the 2 circles with the calculated lengths of front and back armhole + ease.
I can measure before I start constructing if I get my biceps + ease. If not I take my ruler and moving it up or down the cap height line parallel the basic line till I get the width I need. If I construct the conservative way I have mostly to alter the sleeve, put more width in and lower the sleeve cap height. Which is more work for me.
End part 5

Should I add something?

« Last Edit: August 25, 2017, 09:58:19 PM by posaune »

peterle

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Re: drafting a sleeve
« Reply #10 on: August 24, 2017, 10:17:18 PM »
Thanks a lot for this full sleeve service!

One thing I wonder: How do you get the front and back notch of the armhole?

Greger

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Re: drafting a sleeve
« Reply #11 on: August 25, 2017, 04:28:57 AM »
Thanks for writing this up. And, your English is pretty good.  Curl is certainly used right.

Schneiderfrei

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Re: drafting a sleeve
« Reply #12 on: August 25, 2017, 09:42:49 AM »


I wonder if what you mean is the word 'fullness' instead of 'ease' in this case. 

 "as the armhole and so the ease will distribute evenly."

But ease is also completely acceptable.

:)

posaune

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Re: drafting a sleeve
« Reply #13 on: August 25, 2017, 09:56:22 PM »
Part 5
Too Much Ease
Now if you have a sleeve that has too much ease and you do not want to draw a new sleeve, you must take that out. I show you how. (Sorry, it is a 2-piece sleeve but that does not matter)


We all know now where the ease is: 1/3 in front and 2/3 in the back. We want to take out 2 cm. We snip the sleeve like shown into 3 parts. Now start to rotate. First rotating Part 1 to the inside (¼ of the amount to take out here 0.5 cm). Then Part 1 and 2 together again 0.5 cm  to the inside -  rotating point at hem – grainline. And last part 3 (same Rotating point) to the inside to.  We have done away 1.5 cm now for the last 0.5 cm ast we shorten the cap. Naturally you have to move the back notch and the SP2 point higher up.

The Place for the Notches.

Peterle asked how I place the notches. I draft my pattern after Mueller. Now we have a look at the first armhole at the beginning.




You see the front armhole (blue) and the back armhole (red). In the back armhole I have opened the dart again which I have rotated  earlier ffor my pattern to the shoulder.  I have drafted in the front armhole line and the back armhole line which I need for construction. (Mueller draft the back armhole 1.5 cm at back notch away from the back armhole line. Why ever. I think to get more mobility). 
The back armhole line meets the shoulder line. And is parted from that point with 4. The lowest ¼ notch is the place for the back notch.

For front notch I must do some calculations. I measure from side seam to front armhole line. I multiply it with 3 because Mueller parts the armhole 1:2. Now I have my armhole diameter (or armhole width?) here 16.8. This I divide with 4 = 4.2 cm. Go up along the front armhole line and do the front notch.
end part 5
all questions are answered?

peterle

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Re: drafting a sleeve
« Reply #14 on: August 25, 2017, 10:24:41 PM »
Thanks a lot for your efforts. All questions answered for my part.